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Tasty vegan recipes

 
gardener
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Location: Western Washington
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I was vegan in the past but wasn't able to keep it up for life reasons. I'm trying to be more plant based again now but have had a hard time finding things that are tasty and filling. I like variety and for my food to be fulfilling. I'm also 24 and am very physically active. While I love salads, I can't live on raw vegetables. It's also challenging because most vegan recipes are geared towards people who buy everything from the store, which is not me. I don't mind buying some things like coconut milk. So please, shower me with your tasty ideas and recipes!
 
gardener
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Location: South of Capricorn
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I have been passing around a lot of vegan recipes around here, helping my daughter and her friends learn to cook, and helping my mother and her boyfriend implement more veg for health reasons. It's awesome!

I think going into winter you have the perfect opportunity to up your bean/lentil content in soups, chilis, curries. You can also utilize bulk dry goods like soy protein (TVP). I can recommend a few sites that have been awesome for me (I am no longer vegan but we still eat a lot of vegan things) that have good, tasty recipes.
This recipe is a guaranteed winner (use brown lentils, or even red ones, it comes out like magic). https://www.isachandra.com/2009/11/snobby-joes/
In fact anything by Isa Chandra Moskowitz is usually awesome. If you have access to library books check out Vegan with a Vengeance and Vegonomicon, both have fabulous recipes with normal ingredients. (I was a tester on her recipe forum way back in the day).
She is known for her desserts (she wrote the dessert section in the most recent Forks Over Knives cookbook), but her savories are just as good.
http://www.isachandra.com/recipes/

Engine 2 used to have a lot of good recipes as well, lately they seem to have changed their site. https://plantstrong.com/plant-strong-recipes
If you like Indian flavors, Holy Cow Vegan has good recipes and simple ingredients. https://holycowvegan.net/tomato-dal-with-phulkas-fat-free/
Minimalist Baker also has a lot of good vegan recipes (you can search by vegan on the right hand side)
https://minimalistbaker.com/recipe-index/
Vegan Richa also has a lot of good things that work in the instant pot or slow cooker (and not just Indian food, although her cookbook was more indian focused). https://www.veganricha.com/recipes






 
pollinator
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Pumpkin, beans, corn,  Jerusalem artichokes, celery, carrots, parsnips, turnip or radish,  green onion, tbsp of wood ash, boiled till creamy and beans and corn tender, spoon full of coconut oil blended in, topped with crispy hash browns. It's power food. I eat this regularly for the last third of summer through fall and winter as long as I have the ingredients. I'll throw in mushrooms if I find them. I use butternut squash,  Seminole Pumpkins or zucchini that have grown into mature gourds.
 
pollinator
Posts: 367
Location: PNW
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http://www.straightupfood.com/blog/

This is a great site with almost no processed ingredients (most recipes have none). I often use her recipes for inspiration to make my own creations. Her food is filling!

I love my instant pot too and use it regularly to cook a pot of beans, bean - veggie soup, and rice. Beans especially freeze well. I mostly eat really basic foods. Beans, rice, steamed veggies, some raw veggies, some fruit. On the weekends and holidays I get a little more fancy though.

There is another thread here that someone started recently in the food choices page about vegan soups and sandwiches  that you should check out. It had a lot of really great ideas. https://permies.com/t/126364/kitchen/vegan-sandwich-stew-suggestions
 
gardener & author
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Of course North Indian meals are easy to make as balanced vegan meals: rice or chapattis (aka tortillas), any kind of dal, and any kind of curry, which can easily be a vegan vegetable. But recently one of my sometime housemates, a South Indian, has been making dosas, sambar and coconut chutney, and I'm loving it, finding it much more appealing that the standard rice-dal-veg.

For dosas, he soaks overnight: one cup urad dal or moong beans, 3 or four cups rice, and a tablespoon of fenugreek seeds.

Next day, grind it all in a strong blender, adding in water as needed to make a pancake consistency. Then leave it another day to ferment, or not.

Meanwhile, make sambar, which is a yellow dal with vegetables in, typically drumsticks (moringa pods, but we don't get those here), so what goes nicely is lauki (lagenaria/bottle gourd) or zucchini, tomatoes, eggplant, maybe greenbeans and/or carrots. We can easily get sambar spice packets, and we add dried tamarind for sourness, and I now have a curry leaf plant as a houseplant so we fry those in.

Ideally, also make a coconut chutney, which the housemate has been doing because "fresh" coconuts have been available in the market lately.

Finally make the dosa pancakes very thin on cast iron, smear ghee on the flip side, or omit if vegan, and eat the crispy pancakes with sambar and coconut chutney.

Well, I don't suppose anyone will ever make this unless they have eaten it before and probably unless they have seen it made, but I've been loving it, and amazed that it's a full vegan meal and really very deluxe and delicious, even for a non-vegan audience.

Here are some online recipes: dosa, dosa, coconut chutney, sambar.
 
gardener
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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OK, I'm a bit off --- I'll admit that.  When I read the thread title, I thought, "Are people now eating vegans?  That's not very nice."

It reminded me of an old Groucho Marx joke: "I love children, but I can never finish a whole one."
 
gardener
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Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
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I recently delved into the food science behind tasty and fulsome broths so I could make better vegetable stock in my 8qt electric pressure cooker. Findings and some experimental results are at the end of this thread:

https://permies.com/t/58264/kitchen/Adding-vegetable-stock-making-pressure

Any kind of vegan, vegetarian, or plant-based cooking gets easier if you have plentiful rich and tasty veg stock to start with for your cooking liquid.
 
pollinator
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Location: BC Interior, Zone 6-7
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I like the suggestions and links people have posted so far.

It might be a good idea to track your calories for a while until you figure out a good routine for yourself. So often I hear people saying they tried  a vegan diet but "there's less fat and protein in vegan food so I was hungry all the time." If I ask some more questions, it usually turns out that what they were actually saying, without realising it is "there's less fat and protein in vegan food, but I didn't adjust my eating habits to compensate and ended up not eating nearly enough calories so I was hungry all the time."

If you like porridge for breakfast, add some lentils to your grain and make it with nut or seed milk. You don't need to stick with oats, either: brown rice porridge with poppy seed milk, buckwheat porridge with walnut milk, millet porridge with sunflower seed milk, etc. I make a batch of milk every few days (just soaked and blended seeds, no straining) and I have a pot of grain I cook once a week or so for eating as is or cooking further into porridge. And porridge can be sweet or savoury. Look up congee for savoury ideas.

If you like a more proteiny breakfast, look into chickpea flour and kala namak/black salt.  It's great for scrambles or frittata type dishes.

Keep cooked beans on hand and have some, along with toasted nuts and seeds, on your salads or cooked greens.

Cooked chickpeas are really great in stir fry. A super quick, working out in the yard all day and didn't think about dinner until two minutes ago meal we like is a can of chickpeas stir fried with peppers, mushrooms, carrots, and zucchini with Montreal steak spice as seasoning.

Any Buddha bowl type recipe is great for covering all your bases.

I love dosas; although, what I make is a rural Canadian abomination. I use all kinds of grains and pulses. My favourite is half and half by weight brown rice and black beans. Some combos don't work very well. I think millet and urad dal was really gluey. You can make up a big batch of batter (once you find one you like), keep it in the fridge, and just cook up a couple at a time to go with a meal.

Vegan food is easy once you get used to thinking a different way :)
 
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Plant-based, active guy here. Not big on recipes, but I'll share what I do.

Step 1 (Grains): Being gluten free, my core grains are oats and brown rice. The game changer for me is a Japanese rice cooker which makes these with very little work on my part. I'll eat steel cut oats in the morning and rice in the evening, with rice leftovers for lunch. Grains are the primary source of energy and I like that I can scale them up or down based on how much activity I'm doing that day.

Step 2 (Veggies): The two staples are soup and roasted veggies, which are both awesome because you can use whatever's seasonal as ingredients. For the roasts, right now I'll do squash, cauliflower, Daikon radishes and turnips. For the soup, potatoes, kale, carrots and onions. Roasts are made daily for dinner and reheated for lunch. Soup is made every few days. Since I'm weird, I'll make a pureed sweet potato/carrot soup for breakfast (basically baby food) and top it with balsamic vinegar.

Step 3 (Beans): I'll usually eat tofu with rice every meal. Being someone who didn't like tofu for most of my life, I've found the secret is fresh, high fat tofu which is marinated in barrel fermented soy sauce. I'll also make batches of chickpeas, lentils or black beans which I'll reheat alongside rice or vegetables.

Step 4 (Fruit/Bonus Veggies): I'll try to finish every meal with a piece of seasonal fruit. And if I'm feeling fancy will make veggie side dishes like spinach or celery root salad. These are totally optional.

Essentially, I make batches of grains, veggies and beans which I reheat as needed.
 
Posts: 54
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A "G-BOMBS" salad is pretty filling and fast:

G-greens (lettuce or cabbage)
B- Beans or lentils (about a cup, cooked of course)
O- Onion (1/2, raw one is what I use)
M- Mushrooms (saluted mushroom and the other 1/2 of onion with a clove of garlic in a TBSP of coconut oil or water)
B- Berries (1 cup of berries of your choice)
S- Seeds or nuts (1-2 oz)

I like to also add a table spoon or two of apple cider vinegar and some seasonings to taste... salt (if you eat it), pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, or if you grow herbs, chop up some fresh herbs of your choice.  And I add nutritional yeast.  :)

Mix it all up and ENJOY! :)
 
pollinator
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To any and all vegans who seem to struggle with finding filling, savory, "solid", protein packed food, I have one word.  Tempeh!  This fermented soy food (which can also be made with other beans and grains) is so nutritious and yummy and cheap (if you make it yourself) that I make and eat it frequently, and I'm not even vegetarian!  It takes a starter culture and a controlled warm-temperature incubation, similar to making yogurt or yeast bread, for about 48 hours at ~85F.  A warm spot by the stove can work, or in a cooler with a pot of hot water, or an oven with pilot light....my current answer is a small electric brooder heater in a cardboard box.
 
James Landreth
gardener
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Rebecca Norman wrote:Of course North Indian meals are easy to make as balanced vegan meals: rice or chapattis (aka tortillas), any kind of dal, and any kind of curry, which can easily be a vegan vegetable. But recently one of my sometime housemates, a South Indian, has been making dosas, sambar and coconut chutney, and I'm loving it, finding it much more appealing that the standard rice-dal-veg.

For dosas, he soaks overnight: one cup urad dal or moong beans, 3 or four cups rice, and a tablespoon of fenugreek seeds.

Next day, grind it all in a strong blender, adding in water as needed to make a pancake consistency. Then leave it another day to ferment, or not.

Meanwhile, make sambar, which is a yellow dal with vegetables in, typically drumsticks (moringa pods, but we don't get those here), so what goes nicely is lauki (lagenaria/bottle gourd) or zucchini, tomatoes, eggplant, maybe greenbeans and/or carrots. We can easily get sambar spice packets, and we add dried tamarind for sourness, and I now have a curry leaf plant as a houseplant so we fry those in.

Ideally, also make a coconut chutney, which the housemate has been doing because "fresh" coconuts have been available in the market lately.

Finally make the dosa pancakes very thin on cast iron, smear ghee on the flip side, or omit if vegan, and eat the crispy pancakes with sambar and coconut chutney.

Well, I don't suppose anyone will ever make this unless they have eaten it before and probably unless they have seen it made, but I've been loving it, and amazed that it's a full vegan meal and really very deluxe and delicious, even for a non-vegan audience.

Here are some online recipes: dosa, dosa, coconut chutney, sambar.





Thank you everyone, for your suggestions so far. Rebecca, I will definitely try those recipes! Thank you!!
 
Posts: 7089
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Alder Burns wrote:To any and all vegans who seem to struggle with finding filling, savory, "solid", protein packed food, I have one word.  Tempeh!  This fermented soy food (which can also be made with other beans and grains) is so nutritious and yummy and cheap (if you make it yourself) that I make and eat it frequently, and I'm not even vegetarian!  It takes a starter culture and a controlled warm-temperature incubation, similar to making yogurt or yeast bread, for about 48 hours at ~85F.  A warm spot by the stove can work, or in a cooler with a pot of hot water, or an oven with pilot light....my current answer is a small electric brooder heater in a cardboard box.



Alder, do you have a good source for starter culture? I made tempeh for years and you are so right about it.

In the beginning I bought the starter from the Mail Order Catalog from The Farm in Tennessee.  When they did not carry it anymore I was able to get it from G.E.M. on the west coast, both had wonderful very active starters...but GEM quit selling it also.

I found some on line later that seemed 'weak' so just gave up.  I would love to be making it again.

I do read that fermented is the only form of soybeans we should be eating because any others do not digest well.
 
pollinator
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I've posted several things I do over on my blog.  

Recently after reading the ingredients list on a vegan "cheese" spread I got from someone at a farmers market I started experiments with making my own.  Early results are excellent and I can see tons of potential here.  Essentially it's raw cashews, water ( I usually actually soak the nuts in the water to soften them more), and nutritional yeast blended together until smooth and creamy.  I think of this as the base, though it needs spices to make it really good.  This is where things can vary.  I've been using some white vinegar, paprika, cayenne pepper, cumin, miso paste (to give some healthy salt), and often a bit more regular salt.  I suspect I'm going to be writing a blog post about it at some point.  I've also tried using the blended water and cashews as a "cream" in a dish with lots of Indian spices and found it quite divine.

If anyone is interested here are some links to blog posts I have up that involved vegan recipes, or as close to recipes as I do.

A healthy cure for a sweet tooth
a stupendously healthy snack cracker
excellent perennial vegetables you can't find in stores  This one has multiple recipes including vegan potstickers.
a perennial food experiment: stuffed milkweed pods
more healthy, decadent deserts to satisfy sweet cravings
 
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