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Aircrete through the wall flue

 
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This is what I am doing to go through the wall with my flue. I will probably use black single wall inside and insulated pipe outside. This setup will be for a wood stove temporarily to heat a large sun room until I can build an aircrete sub-floor with a hard finish on top. Then I can build a rocket mass heater. I will run the wood stove full throttle and stack concrete blocks and sand to hold heat to help prevent creosote.
 Any ideas or comments are welcome.
 https://youtu.be/agCvadyfe-I

 Thanks
 
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I've a couple of questions for you:
-what is the weight of your aircrete thru the wall?
-do you know the R value of aircrete?


....I know we all do what we can instead of what we will sometimes but I still wonder if there is a natural mix other than concrete (which Mr. Wheaton points out has a huge carbon foot print), which would foam up so nicely and have similar compression strenghts to concrete.
 
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You can use cob, but it is a little harder to get right and needs to be protected from rain. Add perlite for insulation.
 
William Egan
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Orin Raichart I'm not sure of the weight or the R value but I do know the R value is fairly significant. I have seen guys put a propane torch to it for several minutes, like 10 to 15 minutes on 2 or 3 in. peace and still not feel the heat. I do not have an accurate way to measure other than bathroom scales and measuring cup an I like to keep things quick and simple. The main thing I'm concerned with when I make my sub floor with aircrete, other than being structural enough to hold the weight of a 1 or 2 inch hard concrete floor is to have enough insulation to give a good thermal break from the earth below. It would also use a little less Portland than a solid concrete floor and then with solid concrete you would have to put insulation under for a thermal break. How toxic is it to make that blue foam, plus I figure it is at least half the cost of The blue foam.I may even consider trying a cob floor on top of the aircrete subfloor.

 R Scott, interesting concept, cob-foam or aircob. I may try some experiments with that. maybe even add a small amount of cement to help stabilize it, or plaster of paris or hydrocal. Crap here I go spending more money on experimentation.

 Thanks for watching guys.

 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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