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Experimental soil mix

 
Posts: 136
Location: Romania
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Ive added red iron oxide thats sold as a coloring powder in construction stores to this batch of soil.
Im using irong oxide to lower the phosphorus in the soil in order to grow proteaceae plants that need a verry low in phosphorus soil.
Acidic soil makes phosphorus non available but the iron oxide also binds the phosphorus and makes it non available for plants,fungi and bacteria  iet the proteaceae can still access it through their specialised cluster roots.
The seedlings are Gevuina Avellana,a cold hardy tree wich makes nuts similar to macadamia.
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Posts: 6581
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Did you test your soil components for phosphorus prior to deciding to use the iron oxide? And if so, how much phosphorus was indicated by the test.

What nutrient base do those trees require for good growth and nut production?
Does the soil contain silica? silica is generally needed by both plants and bacteria/fungi for processing many of the minerals for uptake by the plants. (it doesn't take much only 0.5% by weight or volume)

Redhawk
 
Mihai Ilie
Posts: 136
Location: Romania
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:Did you test your soil components for phosphorus prior to deciding to use the iron oxide? And if so, how much phosphorus was indicated by the test.

What nutrient base do those trees require for good growth and nut production?
Does the soil contain silica? silica is generally needed by both plants and bacteria/fungi for processing many of the minerals for uptake by the plants. (it doesn't take much only 0.5% by weight or volume)

Redhawk


I made somme tests at the begining but after i mixed the red iron oxide it turned the water red and could not make tests again to see how much it lowered the phosphates.
These trees require low phosphorus and if you fertilise them a cow manure they tree might even die from phosphorus intoxication.
Its a south american tree and compared to the australian and south african proteaceae,they tolerate slightly more phosphorus but the soil needs to be acid ( acid soil makes the phosphorus non available by oxidating iron and aluminum wich bind the phosphates).
Silica is present in the sand.
I also post a picture with the Gevuina nuts from wich these seedlings are grown.
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Bryant RedHawk
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Posts: 6581
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1218
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Excellent! This is one of those trees that benefits more from the use of aerated teas than it does from the usual soil amendments.  (Donkey manure is by far one of  your friends for those trees)

manures you will want to stay away from are; Cow, Goat and Sheep. Manures you can use without worry (once composted or well rotted); Donkey, pig, goose/duck and chicken.
I like to mix rotted manures with chopped straw then use as my mulch layer, by keeping the soil mulched you are also allowing a slow seep of nutrients for the tree roots (if you can get some mycorrhizae onto the roots, the trees will love you back)

Redhawk
 
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