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Guinea Hen

 
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Have you ever tried to cook Guineas?  If so, how do they taste compared to chicken?
 
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If you can catch one, they are a stronger flavored chicken.   Older ones can be a bit gamey but not so much that some seasoning cannot cover that.  The texture is tougher and not as much fat as a chicken so you might have to baste it or the meat is dry.   I don't think older ones are worth the bother because they are so tough.    

The bones are less brittle.

Ours are too hard to catch.   They came with the property and are self-proclaimed guard dogs.  People on the other side of the planet know when someone who does not belong comes up to our door.

I prefer chickens to guinea because I am the one that has to catch supper.  

If given the choice of chicken or guinea fowl, I would pick chickens because they are easier to raise, wander less, and easier to catch.
 
Pavel Mikoloski
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Thanks, Wesley:  I appreciate your response.  I have been lucky in that my guineas have impressed onto my flock of chickens and they wander together during the day and perch together in the coop at night.  Not sure exactly how that happened because I have peafowl too which roost very high up in the tall pines.  I got the guineas as adults so I really am lucky.  I think they must have been raised with chickens which would explain why they cohabit and do everything together.
 
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Not much can outrun some hot lead...
I shoot all my livestock when it's their turn.
They never see it coming and theyre always relaxed till its all over suddenly.
 
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