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!!! Dave Burton's Boot Adventures at Wheaton Labs and Basecamp

 
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I followed the links now. I don't think I will try 'knook'. Too much work for getting something that's exactly like knitting.

The Bosnian crochet indeed is what I meant. But I see here it isn't always in more than one colour. Where they talk about other names, they have 'Dutch knitting' too, so: from the Netherlands. I think I understand that, but then that's the technique in one colour, using non-spun wool (also called 'shepherd's knitting' here).
 
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Good evening! Hello Inge! Thank you, I think we are colleagues in needlework, too! And I appreciate you taking the time to make such a special package for me and others at Wheaton Labs!

Yeah, I learned about knooking before I finally gave into just teaching myself how to knit properly. I had a slight fear of knitting, because my first scrf took me three-four months to make- picking each stitch one at a time. Then, eventually after watching several videos and experimenting between English and American knitting techniques, I figured out a style, hand-positions, and tension that worked smoothly for me. I started with crochet, because I found crochet to be very forgiving, with the simple ability to just tug and undo mistakes. I also started with crochet, because I found the one-hand coordination to be much easier than the two-handed coordination required in knitting. I have not yet worked with non-spun wool; that will have to go on my long-list of projects to do. And hehe, yeah, I try to keep just one project going at a time, so that I actually finish things! However, sometimes, my curiousity to work with a new tool or technique gets me carried away, too!

Day 109

Last night and this morning, I continued my circular knitting project. I am trying to make a closed scarf of sorts, kind of like the turtle-neck on turtle-neck shirts.



The morning was pretty cold and frigid, and it took me a bit to keep my fingers and hands warm, even with insulated gloves on.





Jen, Josiah, and Bella were up at the Abbey this morning doing projects for the Abbey, and Austin and Ron were fetching logs for the Bermshed. Fred and I were doing battery maintenance today and a little willow candy (poop barrel) management.



We set batteries up to charge.



We checked the batteries' water levels.



We made metal tags for the willow candy barrels that we moved into Ranger Doug. jen and Josiah took the willow candy barrels that we loaded into Doug and took them to the Willow Candy Warehouse this afternoon.



We did a little bit of inside work, because it was a bit rough keeping our hands warm while doing battery maintenance outside. We did maintenance on the batteries stored inside the Shop, as well as the batteires in Ranger Doug, Toots, and the Bad Boy Buggy. I replaced the high temperature duct tape on a section of the Batch Box RMH in the Auditorium.





This afternoon, I continued planting living fence seeds at Basecamp!





I saw a little skeleton that I thought was neat!



And I saw an interesting moss, lichen, or fungi!

 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Dave Burton wrote:Good evening! Hello Inge! Thank you, I think we are colleagues in needlework, too! And I appreciate you taking the time to make such a special package for me and others at Wheaton Labs!

Yeah, I learned about knooking before I finally gave into just teaching myself how to knit properly. I had a slight fear of knitting, because my first scrf took me three-four months to make- picking each stitch one at a time. Then, eventually after watching several videos and experimenting between English and American knitting techniques, I figured out a style, hand-positions, and tension that worked smoothly for me. I started with crochet, because I found crochet to be very forgiving, with the simple ability to just tug and undo mistakes. I also started with crochet, because I found the one-hand coordination to be much easier than the two-handed coordination required in knitting. I have not yet worked with non-spun wool; that will have to go on my long-list of projects to do. And hehe, yeah, I try to keep just one project going at a time, so that I actually finish things! However, sometimes, my curiousity to work with a new tool or technique gets me carried away, too!
...


Hi Dave. I first learned knitting at the age of 9 or 10. But then it was very difficult for me. The teacher said I had to hold the (long) needles under my arms. In that way I just couldn't work. During the holidays a friend of my mother told me I did not have to hold the needles that way, I could do it any way I wanted. From that moment it went much better! Then I started to like knitting and later on I really loved knitting.
Crochet I learned even earlier, it was the first technique taught at school: crochet a net (they said you could put balls in it, but now I think it was a shopping net). Back in those days young girls were supposed to learn some useful textile techniques at school. Meanwhile the boys learned woodwork a.a.
I won't tell you here which textile techniques I learned at that higher education. Too much to mention. And then later, by myself, I learned even more (in the seventies/eighties there was a course by mail. Every month they send some new lessons, together with tools and materials. It was expensive, but worth it!).

Do you do techniques without tools too? Like 'macramé' and braiding?
 
Dave Burton
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Good evening! Hello Inge! That course you did by mail sounds pretty neat, and I think the materials coming with the course seems like a nice deal. I have not yet gotten around to learning how to do macrame or braiding. I have done two different techniques that do not require tools- [ur=https://www.wikihow.com/Finger-Knitl]finger knitting[/url] and arm knitting. I did not think arm knitting was too useful, because the holes in the fabric were so big. That may have been a user error, as I did use yarn that was a bit thin for arm knitting. I think I did a tiny bit of braiding during my high school graduation when we sat around waiting to have our row called.

Day 110

This entire morning was spent talking about The Big List for Wheaton Labs, Basecamp, and Equipment. The meeting was quite long, and we discussed priorities, what to mark as completed, what sections of things were comepleted, and what things needed to be added to The Big List.



I mostly tended the fire in the rocket mass heater this morning.



During lunch, I decided to finish my closed scarf.



In the afternoon, I continued planting for the living fences on Basecamp.





These were a couple of the things I saw while planting the living fence seeds.





Finishing the Bermshed is oiur number one highest priority, for the time being, on Basecamp. So, since I seem to be good at peeling logs, I was pulled from planting living fence seeds for a bit, so that the Bermshed could progress. There was a log that needed to be peeled immediately and quickly.



This is the log t\after I finished peeling it. Then, I went back to living fence seed planting.



This was a midafternoon view of where I was planting living fence seeds.

 
Dave Burton
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Good morning!

Day 111

I started the morning by splitting firewood into small enough sizes that they can be used in a rocket mass heater.



I went on a hike up the "Volcano" at Basecamp.







Here is a view from hiking back down.



This afternoon, I operated the rocket hot water heater and got it over 140 Fahrenheit for hot water showers.



This is what the rocket hot water heater for hot showers looked like while I was operating it.



It took me about three to four loads of wood for me to get the water up to more than 140 degrees Fahrenheit.





I ended up took a water sample after almost each load of wood. This is me taking a water sample.



My first water sample was 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and my second water sample was at 125 degrees Fahrenheit. Then, finally, my third water sample was at around 150 degrees Fahrenheit.

 
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Dave, I just wanted to let you know how much I enjoy this thread. Whenever I have a few minutes to play on my phone, I'll often seek you out to see what you've been up to. Thanks for all the pictures!
 
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