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What is you favorite recipe using sourdough starter

 
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I did it!  Started a sourdough starter for the first time.  I wanted to start with something simple to start with, so I made dinner rolls.  My son said we are never buying rolls again.  He also insisted I make them the next night.  Cinnamon rolls are proofing and about ready to go into the oven.  I'm so excited, they look wonderful.  If they taste like they look I will be doing a happy dance.  While I wait I was trying to decide what to try next.  I booted up the computer and decided before I do a recipe search I would ask the permies bunch what you like.  I always seem to get amazing and informed advice here.  What is your favorite thing to do with sourdough starter?  
I did try putting the starter I was going to discard into a pan with olive oil and some green onions and garlic on top.  No one liked it.  Toooo sour and the middle didn't seem done.  Not for us, or I didn't do it right.
I am very much enjoying this process.  So much so I have decided to start a gluten free starter for some of our family members to see what we can come up with for them.  Any one doing this?  What flower alternative did you use?  Almond, coconut, buckwheat, or brown rice flower?  Please let me know, When we make goodies for family functions these people get left out a lot.  Besides I think a lot of our problems with the way we eat is not necessary an intolerance, but an overload.  So it will be good for my family to eat things that taste good that don't have gluten in them.
Thanks for your time.
 
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Congrats on getting a working starter!

I like to make tasty loaves with long slow rises, German type. But you need both a bit of experience and have to like the taste of those! I often mix with rye and/or spelt or potato, often without any recipe at all.

Just wanted to comment on the gluten:
Personally I think if nobody in your family is intolerant to gluten, you should only cut back on the junk gluten (supermarket bread, donuts etc.) and not on wheat per se. The fermentation in sourdough makes the resulting bread not only more palatable but also more wholesome (can't reproduce all the processes that happen during fermentation, but it breaks down some complexes that can be hard to digest; there should be more specific info on the internet if you are interested).

I hardly eat any baked goods that don't come out of my own kitchen, I find most industry-made stuff really repulsive.
I make all our bread and our toast, plus the cookies and cakes, pizza and flat-breads. I buy the occasional Bavarian Pretzels because these are a hassle to make at home.

My family opposes to adding sourdough starter to pizza though, but sometimes I sneak a bit into the dough!
Happy baking, and I hope you get some replies on easy starter recipes.
 
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I like to add a bit of sourdough to standard American soda-raised pancakes.  Cook some right away, then hold some in the fridge overnight or longer and the later batches are yeast-raised.
 
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Mk Neal wrote:I like to add a bit of sourdough to standard American soda-raised pancakes.  Cook some right away, then hold some in the fridge overnight or longer and the later batches are yeast-raised.



I don't know what "standard American soda-raised pancakes" are, but I have been wondering how to make really good sourdough pancakes. Please explain how you make yours!

BTW, I eat my pancakes savory, not sweet, so I sometimes sauté a little onion and pour the batter over it, or drop some pumpkin seeds or other seeds in the wet side as soon as I've poured, and I usually eat them with leftover curry or dal. I guess I consider pancakes just a quick form of bread. But I only know how to make good ones with eggs, flour, milk and salt (and sometimes baking powder but I find they actually come out better without it).
 
Mk Neal
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What I mean is just what everyone in the U.S. would call a pancake, as opposed to European pancakes, which are more eggy like what we here would call crepes.

Basic recipe for me is 2 cups flour (any sort-- wheat, cornmeal, rye, whatever you have), 2 cups liquid which is slightly acidic (buttermilk would be traditional, but could be any dairy product or fruit juice or a mix), 2 eggs (optional), a tablespoon or two of sweetener like molasses or sugar, tables spoon of oil, half-teaspoon baking soda, half teaspoon salt.

I add maybe a 1/4 cup sourdough together with the liquid ingredients in one container, then mix that into the dry ingredients. Should be a thick liquid, not too runny.

Cook on medium hot oiled griddle, adding sliced apples, berries, nuts whatever on uncooked side. Flip when bubbles start to appear on top.

 
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