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How to replace salt with spices

 
eco-innovator & pollinator
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     The story of the creation of this unique seasoning begins, when a  famous Moscow restaurant chef got in a hospital with a heart attack, where he was prescribed a salt-free diet.
      Food without salt appered to be a hardship for him, all food  seemed bland and completely tasteless. Therefore, when he got back from the hospital, he began to try combinations of various spices, which our brain perceives as a taste substitute for salt.
      By trial and error, he determined that garlic, onion, cumin, coriander, black pepper, fenugreek, dried champignons and mustard change the taste of the food so that it no longer seems bland and has a very pleasant taste.
      After a month, he compound a mixture with optimal proportions of all the spices and began to regularly use the seasoning instead of salt.
      Of course, it is almost impossible to completely exclude salt, since salt is a part of many daily foods, such as bread. But we can reduce our normal intake from 5-6 to 1-2 grams per day.
      After a year of regular use of this seasoning, our chef noticed that his general health improved significantly.
      Ready-made powder-like seasoning has a strong smell of spices, but practically does not have its own taste.
Its essintial feature is that it gives a pleasant taste to any dish and no sodium glutamate is needed for this. And if there is a small amount of salt in the dish (much lower than normal), this seasoning enhances the taste of the dish so much that it tastes more salty than it actually is.

      The seasoning ingredients:
* Dried onion powder
* Fried/dried onion powder
* Black peper powder
* Mustard seeds powder
* Coriander seeds powder
* Cumin seeds powder
* Dried garlic powder
* Hay grass (Shambala) seeds powder
* Dried mushrooms (shampignons) powder

To place an order click here: https://ecominded.net/salt-substitute-seasoning

 
gardener
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For those of you who don't recognize the word "shambala" (I had to Google it) the more familiar English name for this spice is fenugreek.

I also had to Google "champignons" -- it's mushrooms.

I feel I should point out that salt restriction is not considered quite as vital as it used to be: Health Effects Of Salt

That said, I have a spice mix that I make up that I use in place of pure salt.  It's about 20% salt, similar amounts of onion powder, garlic powder, and nutritional yeast, plus smaller amounts of black paper, powdered mushroom, cumin, paprika, and red pepper (smoked red pepper when I have it).  It's really tasty and keeps me from chasing more salt on my food.
 
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Dan Boone wrote:
I feel I should point out that salt restriction is not considered quite as vital as it used to be: Health Effects Of Salt



As someone who has very low blood pressure, I need to find ways to increase salt in my diet. This is hard for me, as I don't like a lot of things too salty. I find I can eat starchy things that are very  salty, or even salt plain. But, if it's something meaty or fatty or a broth, I just don't like it very salty. My husband, on the other hand, like his soup to taste like brine!

We all have different bodies and different health needs, and so what is healthy for one person, might not be for another. This is one reason why I try to take health advice with..."a grain of salt"
 
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Love the herb and spice mix, anything to get more herbs and spices into our diet and great for our health.

But I do feel I need to point out that in any discussion of SALT we need to differentiate between sodium chloride commonly referred to as SALT and sea salt or rock salt. Whereas SALT is a processed condiment and as such bad for our health, a good quality sea salt is excellent for our health as it contains a huge selection of minerals vital to our health. Morevoer it does not raise blood pressure as all the elements are in perfect balance, just as nature intended - god/nature got it right! Obviously, any food, herb, spice etc is bad when eaten in excess.
 
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Lucy Gabzdyl wrote:Love the herb and spice mix, anything to get more herbs and spices into our diet and great for our health.

But I do feel I need to point out that in any discussion of SALT we need to differentiate between sodium chloride commonly referred to as SALT and sea salt or rock salt. Whereas SALT is a processed condiment and as such bad for our health, a good quality sea salt is excellent for our health as it contains a huge selection of minerals vital to our health. Morevoer it does not raise blood pressure as all the elements are in perfect balance, just as nature intended - god/nature got it right! Obviously, any food, herb, spice etc is bad when eaten in excess.



Good points.  I used to favour sea salt until I learnt that now over 90% is contaminated with microplastics!  Himalayan salt is said to be pure though since it comes from the salt range foothills.  Pink Himalayan salt has potassium and magnesium that help you get the most out of the sodium your body needs, while countering the negative effects of sodium.
 
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We like to use Gomashio. Its made of ten parts dry roasted sesame seeds and one part salt, ground coarsely in pestle and mortar (or in the kitchen machine). Store in a jar and use like salt. Its a wonderful smell we do love in our dishes... It's part of the Japanese kitchen and sprinkled all over salads and sushi. I even put it sometimes on my porridge. Salt in porridge is more the Scots style though...
 
Lucy Gabzdyl
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Location: Canet lo Roig, Castellon, Spain: Mediteranean:cool wet winter, warm to hot dry summer
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We like to use Gomashio. Its made of ten parts dry roasted sesame seeds and one part salt, ground coarsely in pestle and mortar (or in the kitchen machine). Store in a jar and use like salt. Its a wonderful smell we do love in our dishes... It's part of the Japanese kitchen and sprinkled all over salads and sushi. I even put it sometimes on my porridge. Salt in porridge is more the Scots style though...


Hi Isabella, sounds very tasty! I notice you are in the north of Poland, whereabouts? My sister has a very good friend she visits in Gdansk.
 
Isabella Binder
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Hi Lucy, we are three hours from Gdansk towards the side of Germany.
 
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I've used almost this same mix on steaks since trying to find out how Outback Steakhouse does theirs. It's delicious! It did not call for the mushrooms, but I now must try to find some, since I really like the taste of mushrooms with red meat. I did use salt, also. I can also add that a little powdered chile or chipotle pepper goes well in this mix.
 
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