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Best herbal preparations for a sprained wrist

 
gardener
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Location: Fraser River Headwaters, Zone3, Lat: 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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Hi.

At Christmas time I fell on some ice and landed on my hand.  

It has taken a long time to heal... but I haven't done anything for it.  It aches in the wrist in two positions.

On Friday I decided to get Xrayed.  yikes.  Always kinda freaks me out to do that, for some reason.  I wanted to make sure hat there was no fracture.

Anyway, it's a sprain.  

I was given some commercial preparation and tensor bandages by the good doctor, but I would rather heal such things with herbs in the future.

I have comfrey in the ground, but it was recently -40 C, so I'd need a jackhammer to get some!

So what herbal preparations do you recommend for the future, particularly those which grow in Zone 3?  
 
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Location: Roseburg, Oregon
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In the case of a sprain there is trauma to a joint and it involves a ligament.  Depending on how bad the injury is, depends on the degree of damage. There is usually swelling, tenderness or pain and it is hard to move the joint. The usual treatment is to Rest the area, use ice initially and compression to prevent swelling. Elevation of the part is helpful while resting. In 48 hours you start alternating hot and cold compresses if there are still symptoms. I add ice to the cold water I am using for the cold compress and make the hot one as hot as the person tolerates, but don't want to burn them. You use hot for 3 minutes and cold for 1 minutes. This is done 2-3 times  per day. Always end on cold. The reason for this is that it moves blood and lymph and helps clean up the debris left in the joint as well as brings in nutrients to help the healing. Very simple and very powerful treatment.

Herbs:
I usually use a mix of herbs in an external oil. When it is a sprain it includes ligament damage and Ruta or Rue is specific for ligament damge in both an oil used externally or the homeopathic taken internally. I don't use Rue internally as a whole herb as it can be toxic.  For inflammation and to decrease the bruising faster, you can use Arnica or Saint John's Wort. Some people mix these  herbs together and keep it available as a Trauma Oil. Technically Arnica should not be used on open skin. I use Calendula on open skin wounds usually.

Yes, Comfrey poultices are used externally, but I understand the frozen ground.

 
pollinator
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Oregano oil worked for my sprained wrist. 3x a day, full strength.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Ok.  Thanks Sharol.  I do have plenty of rue growing in my garden.  My mother planted it to ward off deer.  It didn't stop the deer.  But oh well.  I had not heard of Rue's effectiveness with ligaments.  Great to know.

I have used the hot cold treatment to help relieve tense overworked muscles before, but hadn't thought of it for a sprain.  Will try that.

Although I am still working, the wrist is tensor wrapped to immobilize it, so that it, the joint, is still fairly rested.  I do have wild arnica and feral st johns wort as well, in my area, and I'm hoping to get some growing on my property,  

 
Sharol Tilgner
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The reason hot and cold water (a type of hydrotherapy) works so well for sore muscles or strains and sprains or bruises is as follows:
The heat vasodilates the blood vessels bringing in blood to the area and the cold vasoconstricts the blood vessels moving the blood out. This also moves lymph too. This means there is an increase in nutrients coming into the area and an increase in debris leaving. This is thought to be why it increases healing in areas of stagnation such as a bruise, strain, sprain, overused muscle or other cause of inflammation and edema. I find it hard to get most people to use this simple and free method of healing, but once they do and realize how well it works, they are hooked.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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A former partner of mine was a massage therapist.  When she was in training, she learned that technique, and explained it to me.  When she got home, from practical training, or when she began employment, my job was to pour out the bins full of water, just as you described.  One with Ice, and other just cool enough that you could enter it's heat without being too hot.  As a railway labourer, I have used the technique often to very good effect on my tired, over-stimulated muscles.  
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