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composted manures vs composted wood

 
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I have access to both composted manures (horse, goat, cow and chicken) and fully composted wood (wood dirt). Is one significantly better than the other? I can get the wood compost delivered for free to my driveway, but will have to drive an hour and shovel/haul the manure compost. Thanks for any advice!
 
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Laura,

Well mixing both 50:50 would really be the absolute best.  I understand not wanting to drive an hour with manure in the back.

So if composted wood is what you have, let’s start there.  I would not turn down this free material.  If I had an abundance of composted wood, I would want to make raised beds and fill with the aged wood.  To get some fertility going I would plant some legumes to pump in nitrogen.  Further, I would want to get some fungi growing such as wine caps or oyster mushrooms, though given how degraded the wood already is, I don’t know if those would take off.

Ultimately I would try to make the wood into soil by adding in the biological components of soil, many of which are certainly already present.

If you have more specific questions, fire away!

Eric
 
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I would go with the easiest/cheapest.

If i put more thought into it i might look at the end use. Like using the wood based compost on trees and perrenials and grass/manure based compost on annuals and grasses.

I often get confused in the microbiome side of things. If i am correct, woody plants tend to be more fungal based and softer plants are more bacterial based. It would make sense that the compost from it would be also.
 
Laura Trovillion
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Thank you both for your thoughts! I wasn't sure if all compost was created equal, and will ultimately go with the wood dirt and put my time/effort into the million other things needing my time and labor!!
 
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