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Help Id a Mulberry

 
pollinator
Posts: 653
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
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I found this mulberry growing on my fence line last summer.  I tried to identify it though some mulberry focused websites and came up with Morus Murrayana.
Am I correct or is this a Morus Rubra?
20190613_172402.jpg
mulberry
Top has no luster
20190613_172520.jpg
mulberry leaf
bottom has very small fuzz (magnification required)
 
gardener
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What color is the tree's trunk? The trunk color is far better for identification of a species within the mulberry family since almost all mulberry leaves are so similar as to need a microscope to use them for identification of a species.

The Red and Black mulberry are so similar as to be indistinguishable by their leaves alone. The white species has a far redder appearance in the bark of both the trunk and the roots than the black or red species.

Redhawk
 
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It sure looks like a pure red mulberry, if it has a sandpaper feel to the upper leaf surface, I would say it certainly is. Whether or not it's a murrayana is hard to say. From what I understand, the murrayana is a recently discovered subspecies or variety of rubra found only in old growth forests of western Kentucky,  and the only difference is slightly larger leaves and longer berries than the typical rubra. Hope that helps. Either way it's an awesome tree to have.
 
Dennis Bangham
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Dr. Redhawk,
Here are the pictures of the trunk  A greyish brown color with white spots.  
20200127_165400.jpg
Close to the ground
Close to the ground
20200127_165353.jpg
a few feet off the ground
a few feet off the ground
 
Dennis Bangham
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Did some looking around at .edu websites.  Looks like a Red Mulberry by the bark due to it having a greyish bark. The upper side of the leaves are rough and dull and distinct network of small veins and underside of leaf with lightly hairy with pale main veins.

Let me know if I am not assessing the characteristics right.  

Got these descriptions from a Purdue.edu media website.
 
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Check out the paper mulberry. Although its been many years ago, a farm I was working had lots an it was tough to manage...
 
Bryant RedHawk
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That does indeed appear to be a red mulberry Dennis, I have two or three of the red variety and two Blacks, we even manage to get to pick some of the fruits (the animals share begrudgingly but with five trees so far), I think the birds and squirrels get full or tired of eating the berries.

The white mulberry is the only variety I am lacking, but I've had one of them before and didn't really care for the flavor as much as I do the red and black varieties.

Redhawk
 
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