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Bone Broth For Health

 
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Bone broth is one of the most nutrient dense and simple things to add to your kitchen.  I love to make a huge stock pot of venison bone broth each fall. Typically I can it a quart at a time then use about a quart a week. This is while also making a pot of other bone broths throughout the winter.
To give it an even more immune boosting, healthy kick I will add the remnants of fire cider into the broth and have that alone as a spicy soup, or add other meats and veggies into the soup. It is a great way to use of the plants in the fire cider rather than just composting them. It's been a couple years since I've made fire cider though and I am looking for ideas to add to my broth.
I would like to hear more about how you like to prepare your bone broth and any nutrient dense add ons that make your soup superior!
 
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Location: Upstate N.Y.
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We use the bones and trimmings from our deer each year to make a big batch (or 3) of broth. We start by roasting everything on the grill outside until the outsides are nice and crispy, then it goes in the stock pot for 8-12 hours to simmer. For the last 90 min we add parsnips, onions (peel and all), celery, garlic and spices. Once it's done we take it off the heat and let it cool so that the far congeals and it can be skimmed off. Then the broth gets canned or frozen and all the bones, scraps and bits of meat and veggies go to the chickens, who devour it all.

Some tricks we use to get a nice rich broth is to save all the scraps that aren't pure fat or bloodshot. All the cartilage, tendons and bits of meat that don't go in the stew meat pile all really improve the broth. Second, we cut the bones in half to let the marrow out easier. Used to do it with a bone handsaw, but we save a bunch of bones so now we just use a reciprocating saw that's cleaned really well after.
 
Gail Jardin
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B. Rey. wrote:We use the bones and trimmings from our deer each year to make a big batch (or 3) of broth. We start by roasting everything on the grill outside until the outsides are nice and crispy, then it goes in the stock pot for 8-12 hours to simmer. For the last 90 min we add parsnips, onions (peel and all), celery, garlic and spices. Once it's done we take it off the heat and let it cool so that the far congeals and it can be skimmed off. Then the broth gets canned or frozen and all the bones, scraps and bits of meat and veggies go to the chickens, who devour it all.

Some tricks we use to get a nice rich broth is to save all the scraps that aren't pure fat or bloodshot. All the cartilage, tendons and bits of meat that don't go in the stew meat pile all really improve the broth. Second, we cut the bones in half to let the marrow out easier. Used to do it with a bone handsaw, but we save a bunch of bones so now we just use a reciprocating saw that's cleaned really well after.


I agree roasting everything first makes the broth so much more flavorful! I like to use the gelatin that comes off of my poorly cut slabs of fat to use in stews. Cutting the bows intentionally to release more marrow is a great idea! A lot of the time the bones are cut just because I need to make something fit for storage or transportation but I haven't thought to do it on purpose. Thanks for the great tip.
 
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I keep a pot in the freezer filled with non-spoiled vegetable scraps and trimmings, the rind from parmesan cheese, wilted herbs... This will add a lot of depth to any stock/broth (add that in the last half hour or so - vegetable do not need as long to release their flavour). I generally avoid brassicas (cabbage, broccoli).

Recently, I've also started making asian-inspired stocks for pho/ramen, adding slightly charred garlic and ginger to my stock.

Lovage is another great addition. I always produce way more than I'd ever need in the spring, so I dry and freeze a lot to use throughout the winter.
 
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