• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

sharewaste.com...creative ideas for the neighborhood? Help me brainstorm this thing!

 
pollinator
Posts: 377
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
72
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I read an article in The Guardian this morning that wouldn't let go of me: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/feb/29/50-ways-to-green-up-your-life-save-the-planet

I was drawn especially to the website sharewaste.com. What a neat idea, I thought. I'm in a suburb with lots of people who go out for walks after dinner, and I thought it would be neat to set up a little receptacle out front that folks could drop their after-dinner veggie and fruit peelings into on their way past. This might encourage folks to reduce trash and would also give me some scraps to feed my two voracious little peeps. I could plan to check it in the morning and evening, maybe.

Now I'm in a frenzy trying to come up with a clever, attractive way to sit something outside that they can drop stuff in without having to knock on my door. (I've found a lot of people in this area are pretty keep-to-themselves and are far more likely to do something if it doesn't involve chit-chat with other humans.)

I was thinking along the lines of something like the Little Free Library project that would be kind of self-explanatory, would be a feature and not a bug (i.e., charming, not an eyesore), but I am not a builder and do not have the resources to do anything particularly grandiose. I have a little room by the mailbox, a few spots where planter-type things could go, a big mulch bed that's now got a stone sitting on top of the water meter where something decorative could go but be off the street.

Something like a mailbox with a flag you put up would be handy, but it would have to obviously not be a mailbox. Something that wouldn't attract critters (but you can specify no meat scraps). Maybe something hanging on a shepherd's hook? Can anyone think of anything super creative that might be had free or at low cost at a thrift store or on Craig's list. I did inherit three of these, but they'd be ugly sitting out without some kind of covering: https://www.amazon.com/Exaco-ECO-2000-Kitchen-Compost-Collector/dp/B07CV952QG/

I didn't mean to put this into the Fungi forum. If somebody knows how to move it to a more appropriate spot, please do!



 
pollinator
Posts: 283
66
dog trees books bee medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What a wonderful idea to try to have come to fruition! I will brainstorm a bit and let you know if I come up with anything.
 
Diane Kistner
pollinator
Posts: 377
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
72
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
At least I have the text written for the sign:

Give me your tired, your poor,
Your past-prime veggies yearning to feed chickens,
The wretched refuse of your teeming fridge.
Place these, and spent fruits (but no meat scraps), here
To make new life, not loathsome landfill fodder.
 
gardener
Posts: 6670
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1322
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What about a larger (regular size) trash can?
You could paint scenes on the side and lid so it becomes working art.

Redhawk
 
Posts: 67
Location: SE Alaska
22
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

The biggest problem is likely going to be to keep it critter proof.  Most suburbs have raccoons, possums, rats, etc. all who would be attracted to fruit and veggie scraps.  Or even just dogs interested in the smells.  So you'll likely need something with a locking lid and heavy enough not to be knocked over.  Or possibly something mounted or securely attached to a pole or fence post.  Shouldn't be to hard to sink a mailbox post or short fence post in one of the spots you mentioned so you have something to attach the container to.  

You might go with a two part system.  Something larger, heavier, able to be attached to a post or pole, and with a latch to keep critters out.  Then inside some simple plastic buckets or a couple of small trash cans.  Something that you can easily pick up out of the more permanent structure, carry to the chickens, rinse out and return.

A small deck storage box could work as your outer box.  Wood ones could be painted something with something fun or chicken related.  Resin orplasticones might be easier to clean from the food spills, messes that will happen.

Look for outdoor storage bins.  They come on all shapes and sizes.  Some are more decorative others more basic. Some are pretty fancy and expensive others less so.  
storage column

Try searching for sand and salt storage bins.
sand and salt storage bin

Or these food waste bin might be just the thing.  They already come with a mounting system so you could attach them to a fence post. And come in attractive colors.  Not sure how critter proof they are but if they were attached to a post and up off the ground enough to be out of easy reach it might help.  There are lots of other food scrap bins out there and some larger sized ones have mounting brackets so you can attach them to a cabinet door (or outdoor post in your case).  I could see a fence post (maybe painted a fun color) with your sign mounted on the front explaining what it is.  Then one or two of these larger sized bins mounted on either side or under the sign.  It might come of more as quirky yard art than eyesore.  
 
Diane Kistner
pollinator
Posts: 377
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
72
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The deck box, actually, is an idea. I've been thinking about getting one of those outdoor storage benches, and maybe I could come up with something that looks like a little seating nook. And painting a can is a good idea, too. Yeah, the critters will be a problem...I'll have to really think about this.

Thanks for the suggestions!


 
pollinator
Posts: 296
Location: West Virginny and Kentuck
100
forest garden books building ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Are you familiar with the Gamma lids for 5 gallon buckets?  That may be the best security option to keep critters out.  Home Depot sells a slightly cheaper style in their paint department.  It is not quite as easy to spin down properly, though.

I hope you get enthusiastic participation.  I can't even get co-workers to dump their apple peels and extra French fries into the small bin I keep in the communal kitchen.  I think they are afraid it will be stinky to open, though it isn't.

I've finally got both adult daughters saving their scraps in tall Rubbermaid burp containers in their kitchens.
 
Diane Kistner
pollinator
Posts: 377
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
72
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ruth Meyers wrote:Are you familiar with the Gamma lids for 5 gallon buckets?  That may be the best security option to keep critters out.  Home Depot sells a slightly cheaper style in their paint department.  It is not quite as easy to spin down properly, though.

I hope you get enthusiastic participation.  I can't even get co-workers to dump their apple peels and extra French fries into the small bin I keep in the communal kitchen.  I think they are afraid it will be stinky to open, though it isn't.

I've finally got both adult daughters saving their scraps in tall Rubbermaid burp containers in their kitchens.



Actually, I have a few gamma lids! I guess what I need to do is start thinking about how to make a bucket more attractive. I suppose I could dig one into the ground so not much of it is sticking up and keep something inside of it that I can lift out. You're probably right about getting people to do it, though....

 
pollinator
Posts: 513
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
151
urban books building solar rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not to rain on the parade, but I have had rodents chew through the lids of pails or through the rim of the pail to get inside of compost buckets. I felt bad to have the (free) pails mangled, but felt even worse when it happened to my Gamma Lids.

Some sort of metal container is in order. Use a plastic pail inside, so you can replace with an empty one.
 
Diane Kistner
pollinator
Posts: 377
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
72
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So far, I haven't had too much trouble with rodents. Even the squirrels here are relatively well behaved. (The deer, on the other hand....) But there hasn't been a whole lot to eat here until I moved in and started building the food forest structure. And you know what they say: If you build it, they will come....

 
A wop bop a lu bob a womp bam boom. Tutti frutti ad:
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/45/pmag
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic