• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Welcome to Permies.com. Introduce Yourself...

 
Ken Peavey
steward
Posts: 2524
Location: FL
88
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I did a search and realized we do not have a place for Introductions. There are lots of new members joining every day. I think it would be friendly to tell us a little about yourself....

I live in north Florida, work for an industrial contractor as a foreman. That means I put on boots and yell at people most of the day.
I steward just under 4 acres of pasture with some woods around the edges. Instead of a dog, I went a miniature bull-a Lowline Black Angus. There's a couple of roosters around to keep the hens in line. This year I added 3 turkeys to the flock. Next year I'd like to get a couple of pigs. There are some fruit trees-Japanese Plums, Lime, Apple, with more on the way. Pecans, hickory and pignuts grow wild in the forest.
I'm doing what I can to develop this place into an All-Natural farm. Beds are in the works to grow vegetables. I intend to grow enough to open a Pick-Your-Own Vegetable operation to the public. Things are falling in place, but it will be a couple more years before I am able to flush the job.

 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like this "hello" idea!
I live in a little wooden house in the middle of the deep, dark...suburbs in Wellington, New Zealand.
My property's small, about 4000 suare feet all up and there's stuff growing around, up and over everything.
My long term-mission is to maximise water-harvesting and passive solar energy, but considering I do various community gardening/education/roles-they-haven't-invented-titles -for type things, I'm always broke and any solutions must be cheap, small and slow.
Luckily that's all part of the permaculture ethos
I don't have any domestic animals; it's either chickens or a garden for me, and there's no contest! Luckily I know plenty of people I can swap things with for eggs.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We live on a small property, for a Texan. :

Okay, to be serious, we live in Costa Rica though from the USA. We own and manage plantations of trees, which are creating a permanent forest, which will be selectively harvested, hopefully forever. Our company makes doors, flooring, etc, but we also sell wood. We are currently in the plantation phase and starting first thinnings, which includes added back in some more diversity.

In total, we have about 350 hectares, or nearly 900 acres. The hobby plantation where we live is about 30 hectares, and a river runs along the side of it. We have also built ponds for fish, etc.

I am slowly turning everything into a food forest as well, since I like to eat, and love to see wildlife.

Running our company is my real job, but I used to be in software (engineer, architect, director, etc.) and still do some consulting when I get the urge.

We have been married for more than 30 years and still think it was a great idea.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6139
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
187
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fred Morgan wrote:

We have been married for more than 30 years and still think it was a great idea.


That is probably a major key to your success. A couple that gets along will almost always have a major advantage over those who are on their own. Every week I check the new building permits as part of my work. The vast majority of permits are obtained by couples who have plans to stay together. Building a house often tests the relationship. I know several couples whose relationship has survived a build, and I know of a few who fought and spent their way to personal and financial ruin.

High schools often have programs where they pair off the kids and get them to raise a plastic baby. Rather than center on reproduction, I'd like to see if they can get along while building or growing things.
 
Renee Stauffer
Posts: 2
Location: way northern ny
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'll de-lurk and introduce myself.

I discovered these forums a couple of months ago and have been lurking and searching old threads ever since. What a great site! I live in northern NY state, up in the north east corner. Three kids ages 10, 6, 3 and a husband, two dogs, two cats, 20 chickens, 6 ducks, no partridge, but I do have 2 pear trees coming this spring! I used to be a registered nurse, but I don't work outside the home since having kids; I homeschool my kids and tinker with my crazy little projects.

I love this forum! Yay! Now I can post and not feel like a poser.

Renee
 
Ken Peavey
steward
Posts: 2524
Location: FL
88
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Great to have you around, Renee. Any of those chickens qualify as French Hens?
 
Kathy Burns-Millyard
Posts: 75
Location: Arizona low desert
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello, I'm Kathy

I lurked around here for close to a year and finally signed in a couple of weeks ago. I live off grid on 7 acres in a low desert area of Arizona. I'm a freelance writer/author and photographer and work from home using a tethered cell phone.

It's just me, my husband and a house dog at the moment. We have 4 grown kids in different parts of the world. No livestock or chickens yet because we don't have a well or other source of water. We haul in about 100 gallons every week or two for the basics.

We do have lots of critters: coyote, bunny rabbits, jack rabbits, javelina (wild pig), road runner, quail, misc birds, etc. we even had a visit from a gila monster once

I'm working on a variety of water harvesting and dry gardening projects. I have hopes of someday being able to eat some of my crops before the bunnies do.

I enjoy all of the ideas and interaction here
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
bump
 
David Bates
Posts: 79
Location: Mountain Grove, Ontario, Canada
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi.

I'm a bit of a hermit who's been living in a suburban neighbourhood but is about to move onto some undeveloped land that I own. We (the other hermit and I) have thirty acres of round granite ridges with forested meadows between them, a fair amount of swamp and *tons* of rotted limbs and old stumps from when the previous owner took out most of the canopy trees (the big ones).

Our plan is to move out into the wilderness and live as simply as we can. So I've really enjoyed lurking on Permies picking up a few tips and ideas about what we can do while we are there. As I mentioned I have tons of rotting wood, so I guess you know what kind of gardens I'll be making while I wander around, do my hermit thing
 
Chris Lumpkin
Posts: 49
Location: Richmond, VA (zone 7a)
6
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Greetings everyone. I have been lurking here for a few months, taking in lots of info and watching Paul's Youtube videos and listening to podcasts. Actually, I realized that Paul and I go back many years, since I am also a software guy and I have frequently visited JavaRanch when researching stuff for work. Thanks Paul! My partner and I are burning our candles at both ends trying to become more self-sufficient while we are still giving our 40 to the man every week. We both work for state agencies in Richmond, Virginia, and we live in the sub-suburbs about 20 minutes outside the city. I am a software architect, she is a data analyst. She has one teenage daughter who lives with us, I have five kids (from 9 to 21) from my previous marriage who visit us frequently.

Our home was originally a Habitat house two owners ago, roughly 800 square feet with one actual bedroom. While it may not qualify as a "tiny house", once you pack in 7-8 humans, 5 dogs, and 2 cats, it is a pretty cozy squeeze. We have been making that work since I moved in 2 years ago, and we are building a fairly conventional "workshop" (we call it the "bunkhouse" when there are no building inspectors around) which will serve for overflow sleeping and hanging out. We love our tiny electric bills and small space to clean, and we're excited about our outdoor spaces and permaculture projects.

Although we live in a fairly suburban area, our house is on a private road and we are zoned for agricultural use. This gives us quite a bit of freedom when it comes to building codes and animals. We have a small flock of 6 free range laying hens (v 1.0) and one rooster who live in a stationary coop in back of the house. We got a dozen chicks from a breeder 2 months ago, and they are just moving into a mobile coop with portable electric fencing (v 2.0) for paddock-style egg laying chickenhood. I also just got three honeybee hives set up this spring, starting with traditional Langstroth for now.

We have 3.3 acres, with about one acre cleared and the rest in perhaps 50-ish year succession with tulip poplar, a few oaks, sugarberry, sumac, black walnut, birch, and more I am learning about. There is also tons of black locust around, but we don't seem to have any at our place - probably due to an incursion of paper mulberry (all male, no fruit, rapid growing and root suckering), which I am slowly fighting back and hope to replace with the BL and native mulberry and other fruit trees. We are both pretty horrible at growing annuals that need to be watered and weeded and raised into adulthood - we keep trying, but we are also planting lots of trees and weeds and other perennials. There are tons of great weeds in our area, and we are supplementing these with a few weedy medicinals and accumulators. I am working on a permaculture design for our place, so we can try to fit things into a bigger picture where our land can support us and our chickens, and perhaps some pigs?

We are struggling to balance our jobs and raising our kids with doing what we can to become a self-sufficient homestead, or ideally a net exporter of calories. As our kids grow up (and my child support bill drops ), we are hoping to be prepared to "retire" and leave the cubicles behind. I turn 40 this year and my lady is 45, so we are looking forward to spending a good bit of our lives in the dirt!

I have really been enjoying these forums, getting a lot of info and inspiration. Thanks Paul and everybody here for creating this space!
 
Peony Jay
Posts: 145
Location: B.C.
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm Peony. I'm a Canadian gal. I live in the centre of BC. 5 acres with a seasonal creek. Zone 5. Rural but 10 minutes to town.
I'm new to permies and have only known about 'permaculture' for maybe 5 years. I've always been an organic only gardener, try to eat as much organic as possible. I'm an ex-vegetarian and ex-cook/teacher/world traveller...

I'm settled and boring now. I've been domesticated. Married, one kid, one pet...

40's, fit, funny (I have a quirky and dark sense of humour)

I love- gardening, cooking, music, dancing, music fests, being outside, biking, reading (mainly Buddhist stuff)...

I dislike-shopping, commercialism,keeping up with anyone named Jones, Hatfield OR McCoy, snootiness, rude people, people who always have to have the last word, racism, small mindedness,homophobia...
 
wayne stephen
steward
Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in Western Kentucky at the southwest edge of the Cumberland Coalfield , USDA zone 6b. We have 20 ares of mixed use land that has N and S facing slopes, 9 acres of pasture land and about 6 acres of woods. My beautiful wife and smart 15 year old daughter live here with our chickens, turkeys , and Pepper - a tabby that catches more rodents than a mousetrap. I have 25 and 27 year old son and daughter living out west .We have vision of converting this to permaculture farm that supplies us with food and income , trade items. This is a very conservative area- not many hippies - and I would love to see a permaculture based community develop. I work as a Registered Nurse - am currently Director of Nursing at Nursing Home. I see the care of the elderly as the culmination of what permaculture idealizes. If we cannot respect and recieve wisdom from the care of the elderly we are doomed. What does permaculture say about end of life issues in our culture ? But that is a subject all its own. This site has helped me to wrap all the crazy ideas I have had into a holistic vision, Thank You all . Especially Pauls videos and Skeeter Pilarski - what a couple of characters.
 
Peony Jay
Posts: 145
Location: B.C.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nice to make your acquaintance, sir. *hand shake*
I, too, love Paul and Skeeter's videos. So helpful and encouraging. I'm not the only nut out there. Phew!
 
wayne stephen
steward
Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks - and to officially introduce myself Wayne Stephen is my first and middle name . Last name is Charbonneau.
 
Rion Mather
Posts: 644
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all. I love the vibe of the site. The open exchange of ideas is most welcoming.
 
Ken Peavey
steward
Posts: 2524
Location: FL
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome aboard folks!
 
Evelyn Smith
Posts: 15
Location: Rice WA Zone 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I've been lurking a while also. My son and I just moved onto
our land a few months ago we're really excited about
our permaculture farm! Finally, after twentysome
years of trying, we're ready! We are in eastern Washington,
zone 6, and just a few minutes from Canada. We have 22
acres, abt half is pretty flat, the rest is conifers on a sharp
incline.lots of wild turkeys and coyotes.
This is a great site with so much good Information. It's amazing
how helpful you all are!

Evelyn Smith
 
Ken Peavey
steward
Posts: 2524
Location: FL
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good to have you around, Evelyn.
 
John Hutter
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This one time, at ayahuasca camp, I was doing some of dat shaolin tumbling, gasping for air after a set, and I hear a THUD.  Hey, look at that! It's an avocado!  I hadn't noticed, I am under a large avocado tree, and there's fruit scattered throughout its canopy.  I ask the retreat owner later, how long does the season last? "Oh, they seem to drop somewhat regularly year round."  Regular avocados...for free? 

Later, also at ayahuasca camp, we are digging some holes to plant 3 new trees.  One is a palm looking tree that puts out weird fruit with scales that are at least 1/2 large seed pit by volume, and you scrap the orange flesh off of the seed with your teethe.  It's not all that tasty, but they tell me it's very nutricious.  The other two were coconuts. 

The new trees are a number of years old, many kilo root balls in big burlap sacks, so we were digging some sizable holes for them.  The dirt is real soft and fluffy, but digging is still slow because we are repeatedly hitting and having do dig around hunks of wood and these flat rocks and then remove them by hand.  They are like gently curved sheets that look smooth but feel rough, almost black in color, never more than an inch thick. I've never seen such a collection of rocks in dirt before.

Que son estas piedras? Hay un tipo?  I ask as I'm turning over one that would almost work as the top of a small end table.

No son piedras. Son de ceramica.

It took about 10 minutes of broken conversation for me to get it, because my spanish wasn't great.  The whole place as on a section of man-made soil.

La gente lo puesto alli!

Que quiere decir, fecundo?  At least I knew the word, Hueso, when it was pointed out to me.  Can't get them all...

I always liked growing things, though I had only toyed around with cannabis before, and my interest was piqued.  Later that day, I found out, the soil is many centuries, in some cases an eon or more old.  Put their by a civilization that otherwise isn't known to have left a trace.  Then I was very interested. 

Thus I was introduced to the concept of building soil.   I am attracted to trying psychedelics that have a history as psychological medicine/shamanism, and because of this, I ended up digging in Terra Preta.

Drugs are bad, mmmKay?

I like making things, I should try making some of that, some time... 

It was very amusing, I could study some ancient creation that is in a way more valuable than all the megaliths on the globe.  Like Indiana Jones, but with dirt instead of artifacts.  Not as glamorous as golden idols and massive stone temples, but it will do.  Not that I've given up on stumbling into another lost civilization...

I'd settle for digging up some of this dirt, and measuring all the pieces of stuff I found in it, because I majored in math and always fancied myself an experimental scientist, and had never really had the chance to be one in a way that was interesting. 

Unfortunately I knew very little about soil, and my brief bit of reading before taking the measurement did not prime me to differentiate between charcoal and wood.  I counted it all as wood/duff/organic matter.  I remember some of the pieces were much heavier than others, there was definitely charcoal in the mix.  In any case, all the 'wood products' were just about black.

I spent about 20 hours picking through 50 kg of dirt for this measurement.  It was then dissolved in batches in 5 gallon buckets after I picked out and organized every component I could identify larger than a pebble.  I'm sure there is significant variance in different Terra Preta sites in any case.  This bit was off the Terra Preta charts with the bone.

5 years later, I am google searching "clay soil amendment" doing a bit more research before I actually started toying with the soil project that would happen in clay suitable for the likes of dandelions and making ceramics.  It didn't take too many google search returns before I was on the Permie website forums earlier this year.  Over the next 6 months, I watched a few dozen hours of related videos.  Sepp Holtzer mountain farm...good god, that's how it's done.  I've always been into those steep grades.  Falling water junky.

world domination gardening, enlisted.  I make these to pay bills in the meantime...http://www.tubewringer.com/  Silly little tool.

Currently seeing how much food I can coax out of my parent's mostly hardpan anaerobic clay hillside for now, for immediate nutrition and practice with soil.  The corn hardly put out, but I got 52 lbs of butternut squash from 4 plants, planted in areas covered by english Ivy before I started messing with it!  CHeers!  The 3 delicata squash plants simply up and died soon after barely growing and putting out a flower or 2  : (    The Brassicas thrived, more cabbage and kale than an individualwants to eat.  There's going to be quite a preserving project when the ice comes.  Brad's Crunchy Kale ftw.

Any Oregonian stewards here know the Yinyang platform up Susan creek on the North Umpqua?  I'm pretty sure my place is in the area! LOL. 

So much great information on this website.  Hope to add!  Glad to be! 

 
Mary Hyde
Posts: 3
Location: Near Marietta, GA
food preservation forest garden hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello!
My name is Mary Hyde and I am new to Permies! Much thanks to Paul et al for hosting/shepherding this site. I am currently living near Marietta, GA, where I am self-studying permaculture and 'playing' with the concepts in my own yard. (I <3 hugels and swales!)

Back in 2005, I started having dreams about a piece of property I was being drawn to somewhere, which I referred to as "The Land". The dreams continue on and off to this day, and I have narrowed the location of "The Land" to Colorado. (I know, it's a big state, but I've got it narrowed down from 48 states to one, so...Yay me!)

I am looking 1st) for folks who don't look at me oddly when I talk about permaculture and taking care of the Earth; 2nd) don't look at me oddly and with deep concern when I talk about having dreams of Land and having a Dream to one day BE on that Land; and Finally) just a group of friends with whom I can talk, laugh, dream and share openly and freely, without judgement or condemnation. Bonus: any help finding and acquiring the exact piece of Land that God/Gaia/my Higher Self has in mind for me would be most welcome too.

So, thanks much for listening/reading! I look forward to getting to know some of you!

Love and Peace from my soul to yours,
Mary
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3782
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
145
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Howdy Mary, welcome to permies!  Come on over to the "Rockies "forum and lets talk more about Colorado !

https://permies.com/f/30/rockies
 
Mary Hyde
Posts: 3
Location: Near Marietta, GA
food preservation forest garden hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for the kind welcome, Miles. I am just starting to peruse the Rockies forum.

Now I just need to 'get my footing' with navigation on this site...
 
Toni Rinker
Posts: 21
Location: Fallon, NV
food preservation forest garden tiny house
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello...my name is Toni. My husband (Stuart)and I are at the beginning of our life change and will be going off grid in Idaho in spring 2018. My husband is always on Permies and so I decided to check it out and found this site to be great! We have done a lot of research and believe we have what it takes although we will be asking for advice. We started a YouTube channel for people to follow but we have never done videos before.  I will include the link below if anyone is interested but please let us know what you think.
It's really scary and exciting thinking about this life change and only hope we succeed. We have a lot to do to get our house ready to sell and we still have to find property.

https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCYRSMRS6RWfrw3PZKgbE50w
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3782
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
145
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Howdy Toni, welcome to permies ! Thanks for the videos!
 
Dave Keck
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi I may be selling my Idaho property with 7 acres and an off grid Strawbale cabin. It's near the town of Clearwater about 15 miles NE of grangeville. Email me with more details davemrk@outlook.com
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!