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Suggestions for cooking yak tripe (stomach)?

 
gardener & author
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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I just got some yak meat, but about a third of it is stomach. It's kind of a shaggy rug on one side. I will ask local friends for advice on how to cook it, but I wonder if any of you have any advice! By the way, yak meat is basically beef, I guess, but very very free range, and probably not as young as typically butchered in your countries.

For regular meat, everyone here always (but absolutely always!) uses a pressure cooker. I now have an induction burner, which can be used as a slow cooker if necessary. So I have a pressure cooker, gas stove, induction cooker, and even an oven -- lots of choices!
 
pollinator
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My favourite tripe dish is prepared in a light broth, usually smelling of ginger and green onion. It's a dish I typically have at dim sum, though I have never prepared it myself.

I know that yak milk and butter can be salty to the taste. Is it the same with the meat, do you know?

In any case, I would expect a low, slow boil to yield some tasty results. I hope, however you prepare it, that it is yummy!

-CK
 
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Here the inevitable use for stomach is dobradinha, a tripe-and-bean stew. It is one of those things I want to like and I try it every so often, just to vom a bit in my mouth and feel bad about myself for a while afterward (sad but true. It is only this and liver, I swear I eat everything else you could possible imagine).
This blog belonged to a friend of mine and talks a bit about cleaning, which is absolutely essential to make an edible final product. If you don't clean it out well there is a smell I can only describe as "diaper pail" (which may be why I can't eat it. I am pretty sensitive with smells and even when people tell me the tripe was prepared well, I can still smell it). http://flavorsofbrazil.blogspot.com/2011/04/recipe-dobradinha.html

(i also note the pressure cooker love here- it seems the harder people have to work or the more they have to pay for cooking fuel, the more popular pressure cookers are. I love mine to pieces.)
 
Rebecca Norman
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Thanks!

Tereza, your account is not very encouraging... It looks fairly well cleaned, and I cut some more little bits off it, but I dunno...

Chris, I'll google that up.

Yak butter and milk are not salty. The butter tea is salty from.... salt. And butter, which around here is very rarely yak butter, and much more often commercial Indian butter. We had a French guy here to teach cheese making a few years ago, and he made some lovely cheese from yak milk, and I wouldn't have known it was yak milk except that it was soooo buttery and high-cream.

We had some yak meat already this winter, and it wasn't salty, it was just like beef. What we had was mostly ribs, extremely fatty and extremely tender, oooh! My housemates made curry in the pressure cooker and it was great.
 
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Scrub it scrub it and scrub it again, then give up and feed it to the dogs.

In all seriosuness it needs scrubbing with a stiff brush under running water on the honeycomb side. once it no longer smells as if it will kill you then you can think about cooking with it. Cured meats are a common companion things like chorizo. One traditional British way is with milk and onions, cook diced tripe until tender, 2-3 hrs at a simmer. Then fry onions make a white sauce and put the tripe and onions into it, add parsley/lemon juice to taste.
 
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I remember eating "buff-momos" in Nepal, that is, buffalo momos (dumpling), buffalo is not yak, I know, but really a local food in many places in Asia. Actually was quite ok!
Tried more than once buffalo skin sallad in northern thailand (not available in tourist restaurants, only in the local market), that is a really nice dish, with lots of spices and herbs.
 
Tereza Okava
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Skandi Rogers wrote:Scrub it scrub it and scrub it again, then give up and feed it to the dogs.


I am just now chatting with a friend who is from the region where the recipe I quoted above is from.
This is almost verbatim what her suggestion was. Except maybe skip the scrubbing/soaking/boiling and just cut to the chase.
 
Skandi Rogers
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Tereza Okava wrote:

Skandi Rogers wrote:Scrub it scrub it and scrub it again, then give up and feed it to the dogs.


I am just now chatting with a friend who is from the region where the recipe I quoted above is from.
This is almost verbatim what her suggestion was. Except maybe skip the scrubbing/soaking/boiling and just cut to the chase.



Yeah dogs love green tripe, you can buy it frozen and pelleted, but feed it frozen, if it defrosts the smell... well
 
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my french brother in law used to cook up sausages  made from tripe ---in their duplex house ---neighbors used to phone and report a  suspicious smell to the police---first time i joined him at the table for a feed ---i had a bad cold and never noticed ---he mistook my completing the meal as a sign of a fellow offal enthusiast ---few months later when the smell from the previous batch had faded and my sister allowed him to cook up another batch---i got the invite ---and smelt it from down the road as i walked up---powerfull stuff ---no amount of cleaning will totally eradicate the smell and those that go out of their way eat offal say its all the better for it .
 
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maybe this site will be helpful?

OffalGood Marinated Tripe
 
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Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
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Until it became difficult to source, we'd use the honeycomb tripe regularly as a side-dish curry in summer. If you're familiar with Asian cuisine, there are usually a few main courses and several side-dishes that exist simply to provide additional flavour and texture.

After thorough cleaning under running water, the tripe is first boiled in salted water and left to cool.

Prepare a curry sauce to your spice selection preference or use a commercial curry powder – no additions like potatoes, peas, etc. Be aware that tripe really holds 'heat', so be careful with how much chilli you use!

Cut the tripe into very thin strips about an inch in length and gently stir through the hot curry gravy on a gentle heat until cooked - it doesn't take long. As with all curries, it's best eaten the following day when the flavour is absorbed into the meat.

The result is a very tasty curry with a unique texture - slightly rubbery and gelatinous when cold. Sound not so great, but, it's flavour is very moreish.

As a leftover, it's perfect in hot weather used simply as a cold spread, with a garnish of coriander, on toast for a light brunch or lunch!

 
Rebecca Norman
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Thanks, F Agricola, that sounds doable!
 
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There's an Ecuadorian dish called "Guatita". It's a tripe stew with peanut butter and potatoes (i also like to add chickpeas). It's just lovely! and easy to make. First, though wash the tripe and let it rest in a solution of water, salt and lemon juice (1/2 a lemon). Let it sit for 10 min.
https://www.laylita.com/recipes/guatita-or-ecuadorian-tripe-stew/
 
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Out here in southwest we wash the stomach of sheep thoroughly inside and out then stuff the stomach with blood onions peppers and fat from sheep.cook in a pot rotating the stomach until it's cooked.Makes a blood sausage.Also have had cow cut up and fried.I am most curious about yak would love to try it one day.sounds good!
 
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