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Looking for elderberry root stock or bare root plants

 
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Location: Montana
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Anyone know a good source for elderberry root stock? Hoping to find Bob Gordon, Ranch, and Adams. About half a dozen of each, depending on cost. Thank you!!!
 
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Nice one.  I live in the Flathead but am interested in acquiring a few Elderberry rootstock as well.  thnx for posting. Please leet me know if there is a meet up.  Cheers
 
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if you dont mind asking what benefit do you get with elderberry rootstock? faster growth, hardiness, dwarfing? i ask because i was under the impression elderberry was generally not that big, very hardy and grew/rooted from cuttings very well
 
pollinator
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C. West wrote:if you dont mind asking what benefit do you get with elderberry rootstock? faster growth, hardiness, dwarfing? i ask because i was under the impression elderberry was generally not that big, very hardy and grew/rooted from cuttings very well



I'd never heard of rootstock for EB, curious about advantages as well!
 
pollinator
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They're super easy to root from cuttings. I have 25 starts rooting right now that I was going to take to a seed swap in a couple of weeks, but, you know.
If you know someone with a bush or know where some wild ones are you can probably still start some, though it's best while they're dormant. Here's a link that tells how. Once you recognize what they look like in the wild you'll see them everywhere! (If they grow in your area.) Good luck!

 
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C. West wrote:if you dont mind asking what benefit do you get with elderberry rootstock? faster growth, hardiness, dwarfing? i ask because i was under the impression elderberry was generally not that big, very hardy and grew/rooted from cuttings very well



Melissa posted here this reply about what she meant:

Melissa Pernell wrote:Oops I guess I used the wrong term. I meant the bare roots for planting.



 
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Location: Indiana
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I bought root stock from R. H. Shumway as 2 plant types, 2 bare roots each. The cost at that time seemed to be just a bit over $20.00.You should have two different varieties for pollination.

Shumway's now has the same type of offer in their catalog. "Offer includes Adams #1 and York, both hardy, vigorous varieties producing heavy clusters of fruit when planted in combination.  2 yr #1 bare-root plants. Zones 4-8, 2 plants for $24.99. Get 2 more for only 1 cent. 4 bare-root plants for $25.00.

I had really good luck on all of the roots producing greenery 2 weeks after planting. There wasn't much but in another 2 weeks there was a lot of greenery. I planted near the edge of a wet spot so the further away from the wet spot the larger the bushes grew. The first year the 2 larger produced lots of flowering heads, but the birds got the berries. The 3rd plant had several heads and berries and the smallest had only a few heads and very few berries.

After the Adams & York plants I am going to find FOUR other varieties, one plant each, and plant about 5 ft apart from the others. Hopefully in a couple of more years I'll be able to make a couple of gallons of Elderberry WINE! IF you've never tried that - you don't know what you're missing. GREAT WIND!!!

Other than Shumway's just type in "bare root elderberry" and you should get several hits for that. BUYER BEWARE!! There are some plants that I found for as little as under $10.00 and all the way up to over $100.00. Do your browser shopping BEFORE YOU BUY!

And YES, growing slips (cut on a slant) from the bushes could generate you a little income! IF I did that I would not sell for under $10.00 each.
 
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Cara's Nursery in Missoula have some beautiful Elderberry.  I got mine there and it doesn't need another one to pollinate. I purchase "Sambucus Nigra-York".  I live in a forest in Sanders County.  If you have any deer about, they like it too.  My EB was doing great making berries and flowers.  And then, one morning all the flowers and berries had been harvested by the deer.  Now they won't get sick maybe too.  But I will have to fence it off so it can reach the height they won't distrub.  
 
Jesse Glessner
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Dawn Gandalf wrote:Cara's Nursery in Missoula have some beautiful Elderberry.  I got mine there and it doesn't need another one to pollinate. I purchase "Sambucus Nigra-York".  I live in a forest in Sanders County.  If you have any deer about, they like it too.  My EB was doing great making berries and flowers.  And then, one morning all the flowers and berries had been harvested by the deer.  Now they won't get sick maybe too.  But I will have to fence it off so it can reach the height they won't distrub.  



l've seen a post long ago in a garden forum to use the 1/4" posts with the "spade" on the bottom to push it into the earth and then use a monofilament fishing line to surround your EBs. The deer apparently cannot see the line but when they hit it they are frightened off. You might give it a try as a cheaper deterrent over woven wire and fence posts - and a gate!
 
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