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Morel?

 
gardener
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Spotted on a walkabout
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Morel
Morel
 
steward
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Looks like one to me! Yum!
 
Artie Scott
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Figured where there was one, there were probably more...
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Morels
Morels
 
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Artie - there is something called a "false morel" and it's easy to tell when you slice them tall-wise in half. It's been too many years to describe that difference, but I expect it's on the web somewhere. I also read that the "famous morels" grow in burned areas. The less famous ones may not taste as good and may need extra cooking, but it's still worth trying.  They show up on my land about every 5 years - I enjoy them when they come, but I always double-check the web to be extra safe.
 
pollinator
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The false morels are quite different in my opinion.

I am attaching a picture of one kind. They are all called Gyromitra something

On our property, we have one kind of mushroom, Verpa Esculenta, that looks like a morel, but is also edible. I don’t have a picture of them right now.

Yours looks like the real thing. Where are you located? I’ll come get it, ha ha!
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[Thumbnail for 7353CD2D-27B7-486D-94D6-59A9A3B16D1A.jpeg]
 
Artie Scott
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That’s interesting, Jay, as it has been 5 years since the last time I spouted one on my property. Always wondered why I never saw them again and presto, there they were, 5 years later!  Different spot though.

Is that an actual thing?  Are they like cicada’s or something, they come around on a regular schedule?
 
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Very cool! What associated trees are in that area? Is it sandy? I’ve never found any and want to up my chances.
 
Jay Angler
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Thank you so much for posting the picture Liz! With the quarantine, my son is using my computer during the day to work from home, and I'm not very good at using his "play computer".
I like to be *extra* safe with mushrooms because look-a-likes can exist based on which part of the planet you're on, and sometimes a safe one in Europe and a deadly one in North America.
 
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Is there a tree nearby that is dying? I believe morels live symbiotically with a tree, happy to play the trade sugar for minerals game. They seem to put up a bunch of mushrooms when they sense the host tree is dying and they want to move. I would continue to look in the same area
 
Jay Angler
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My most recent ones were beneath a cedar tree. The cedars have been in decline around here, but the nearest few certainly aren't dead yet despite the intervening five years.

If you find more than you need for immediate consumption, mushrooms dry well and are great for crushing into soups and stews!
 
Artie Scott
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In this case, the morels are near the creek, about 30 feet away. Nearby trees include black walnut, ash, and sycamore. I will take another look to see if there is a dying tree nearby, and look more careful my at the nearby trees to see if there are other varieties. I would say the soil is sandy loam

The first time I found them, it was a very different location, hilltop, very rocky, on Oak level-Siloam complex soil. Nearby were cedars, poplar, persimmon and hickory, and the stump of a very large old oak tree that was  probably cut 11 or 12 years ago.
 
Liv Smith
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Jay Angler wrote:Thank you so much for posting the picture Liz! With the quarantine, my son is using my computer during the day to work from home, and I'm not very good at using his "play computer".
I like to be *extra* safe with mushrooms because look-a-likes can exist based on which part of the planet you're on, and sometimes a safe one in Europe and a deadly one in North America.



Totally agree with you. I never give any opinion on mushrooms on the internet based on just a picture.

Things can look very deceiving, and when it comes to deadly mushrooms, one doesn’t want to give the wrong advice.

That being said, I still think Artie’s could be considered as being one of a real morel.

Here is a picture of my Verpa bohemica that I gather every year, and eat them. They grow in the same exact spot every year, very close to a creek around a big, beautiful cottonwood tree. There are also big leaf maple trees around, but I have a feeling that’s not the cause. There are a lot of maple trees around that creek, but the mushrooms only grow in this particular spot.







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Artie Scott
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Took another look today, and they certainly multiplied!  Here are some pictures of the area. Turns out, there is a large tree that looks like it is dying nearby - looks like a black walnut.
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Morel location
Morel location
 
Artie Scott
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Here is the tree that is dying nearby. And the harvest!
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Dying tree
Dying tree
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Morels!
Morels!
 
Jay Angler
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If you want to spread the enjoyment, mushrooms are super easy to dry and then can be crushed into soups, stews or sauces to give wonderful flavour!
That's a great harvest.
 
Liv Smith
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Oh, wow! Super jealous over here.

Enjoy your harvest!
 
pollinator
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Funny I was just reading and watching videos about Morels



If you go here https://mushroaming.com/Pacific_Northwest#morchella_elata_group Just bellow the Blue Chanterelle is the Morel section.

For those who would like to try to inoculate an area https://northspore.com/collections/sawdust-spawn/products/morel-sawdust-spawn just know there is a reason people have to forage them.
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