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Giardiniera - lacto-fermented garden veggies

 
steward
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I fleshed out my method/recipe for giardiniera so that it is novice friendly!


(Image credit Colter and his Fermentation Station thread here!)

Giardiniera

This is a “pickle” or a naturally lacto-fermented mild flavored vegetable combo. Just chop and add brine, no cooking!

Lacto-fermented “pickles” do not have vinegar and work as a probiotic adding healthy bacteria to our guts.

Ingredients
  • cauliflower, 1 head
  • carrot, 1-2 medium size
  • celery, 1-2 stalks
  • red bell pepper, 1
  • red onion, 1
  • sweet bell pepper, to taste - around 4-6 littles, left whole; or include another large bell pepper
  • fresh dill, 1 head + some leaves (dried dill works well, too, +/- 1 T. or to taste)
  • garlic, 2-4 cloves
  • “starter” - +/- 4 tablespoons whey or active sauerkraut brine (see step 3 for more info)
  • salt brine to cover, 1-2 tablespoons salt (preferably not iodized*) per cup of water

  • 1. Start by dissolving your salt in water - you will likely need anywhere from 1 to 2 quarts brine. This can take some stirring and time. If using a less salty salt (kosher or sea salts are less salty than most table salts) use the upper range of salt. If you boil your water to dissolve the salt, make sure your brine is room temperature again before pouring over your veggies.

    2. Chop veggies into pleasing, bite sized shapes and sizes. Leave the dill head whole, if desired; garlic can be whole or chopped though it’s often left whole. Mix veggies in a bowl, then pack into a wide mouth jar with the dill - you might need (at least) one half gallon jar, or two quart sized canning jars.

    3. Add your “starter,” splitting between jars as needed, to make sure you’re inoculating with good lacto-fermentation bacteria, then fill up the jar with brine, making sure the veggies are completely covered. You might need a weight on top of the veggies to keep them submerged in the brine. Veggies poking above the brine can get moldy.

    About “starters:”
    --sauerkraut brine - use either homemade kraut brine or brine from the active cultured kraut in your grocery’s refrigerator section; NOT the canned, shelf stable kind. Using kraut brine keeps your giardiniera vegan and dairy free.
    --whey is the liquid that separates off the top of plain, unsweetened, live cultured yogurt.

    4. Loosely cap your jar of giardiniera, place inside another pan or bowl, and let sit at room temperature, out of direct light, until it acidifies to your liking. In very warm environments, this might only take a day or two. In cooler environments, a week or two is fairly common. The pan or bowl is to catch any overflow from the bacteria doing their work and expanding the brine. Check daily for flavor and to make sure veggies stay submerged. When flavor is lovely to you, store in the fridge or a root cellar. Lacto-fermented foods will keep fermenting slightly / very slowly in the fridge and can be stored in a root cellar for up to six months, and longer in the fridge.


    *There is debate on whether the iodine in iodized salts prevents the lacto-bacteria from doing its good action. I simply prefer the taste of salts that are not iodized in my ferments.


    Any other tips or variations to add?


     
    pollinator
    Posts: 231
    Location: Italian Alps, Zone 8
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    Giardinieras are so delicious and your recipe for it looks great! Lactofermented giardiniera is my favourite method of prepping them as well.

    One thing I’d add to your recipe if you want to simplify it further: there’s usually no need to add a starter to a mix of veggies like these. There are already plenty of the necessary bacteria living on the skin of the veggies and your hands (which transfers on the veggies when handling them). Just make sure there’s no chlorine in the water that you’re using for the brine. Ofcourse no harm in kickstarting them if you have a starter at home anyway. But for those who don’t, just know that it is also possible without, it just might take a tad longer. But you have to wait a while anyway for all those delicious flavours to develop :-)
     
    Jocelyn Campbell
    steward
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    S. Bard wrote:Giardinieras are so delicious and your recipe for it looks great! Lactofermented giardiniera is my favourite method of prepping them as well.

    One thing I’d add to your recipe if you want to simplify it further: there’s usually no need to add a starter to a mix of veggies like these. There are already plenty of the necessary bacteria living on the skin of the veggies and your hands (which transfers on the veggies when handling them). Just make sure there’s no chlorine in the water that you’re using for the brine. Of course no harm in kickstarting them if you have a starter at home anyway. But for those who don’t, just know that it is also possible without, it just might take a tad longer. But you have to wait a while anyway for all those delicious flavours to develop :-)


    I love your tips!

    Yes, cauliflower is in the cole crops / brassicas family that naturally has the right bacteria. I'm just extra careful about using a "starter" because I had gallons (literally gallons!) of onions go moldy because I didn't add a starter and onions do not naturally have the right kind of bacteria on them. So, with onions and other veggies in this mix that are not brassicas, I have usually erred on the side of caution.

    Also, I think if you do have chlorine in your tap water, that boiling it first could do a quick release of the chlorine, do you think? Then the salt dissolves quickly in boiling hot water, but of course make sure the brine returns to room temperature so you don't cook the veggies or kill the good bacteria.

    There are pictures on permies of others making giardiniera and I think it is SO pretty! Post your pics here if you've got them!


     
    S. Bard
    pollinator
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    Boiling indeed helps with the chlorine. I usually just fill a big pot of water and leave it uncovered overnight though (maybe a cheesecloth on top if you have flies in the house). The chlorine evaporates overnight.

    Usually when fermenting veggies that have less of the good bacteria on them, I just add a leaf of cabbage on top. Helps to keep all the floaties down as an added bonus!
    A slice of organic ginger also helps speed up fermentation. And carrots fermented with ginger is a really good flavour combo by the way!!

    Speaking about pretty ferments... not a complete giardiniera, but here’s a salad we made topped with our lactofermented onions and carrots. I just love the colours!
    salad-with-lactofermented-carrots-and-onions.jpeg
    salad with lactofermented carrots and onions
    salad with lactofermented carrots and onions
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