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Pig Bomb

 
Gwen Lynn
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Unfortunately, like many animal shows on TV, this one is sensationalized. However, it's still interesting.

IMO, the adaptability of the pig makes a great case for secure fencing. Especially in temperate zones &/or where there is little predation.

"Pig Bomb" airs again on the Discovery Channel, April 10th; but there are many video clips at this site.

http://videos.howstuffworks.com/discovery/34365-pig-bomb-unpicky-pigs-video.htm
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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What are the predators of wild pigs - wolves and cougars? The video doesn't mention the lack of predator control. Haven't wolf populations been decimated in many places? Probably cougars, too.
 
Gwen Lynn
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I would guess that wild (or feral) pig predators would depend on how big the pig (or piglet) was & what the part of the world those pigs are in. There are snakes in South America that could kill a small pig. Alligators, crocodiles, etc. would be predators in more temperate zones. It sounded to me like there isn't enough predators to get the feral pig populations under control, hence the concern.
 
Susan Monroe
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Feral pig populations almost always seem to be in areas with low predator populations, but I suspect that even a large predator like a cougar, wolf or bear wouldn't necessarily want to go up against an adult feral pig.  They probably just look for opportunities to get the young pigs.  I can't even see wild dog packs taking on a big boar or sow.

Sue
 
Gwen Lynn
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No doubt, Sue!

In the video, they were using dogs to help hunt pigs. Pretty sure some of the dogs were pit bulls. Very intense to watch. Almost too intense! Pit bulls are probably perfect for pig hunting. They were just latching on & not letting go. Scary.
 
paul wheaton
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In his book, "In Defense of Food", Michael Pollan promotes eating feral pig meat.  He thinks it's one of the last ethical options for meat eaters such as myself, and this video supports his claim.  My neighbor hunted and shot a feral pig last year and kindly shared some of the chops with me.  I threw 'em in the crock pot with a bottle of Annie's natural barbecue sauce and I think it was one of the best meals I've ever had.  So I have to admit that I salivate a little when I see this video...mmm...those chops were so good...
 
Gwen Lynn
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Score one for your neighbor! I love pork (all meat, actually) too & I totally support the hunting of feral pigs. I bet it was really tasty! What concerned me about this is the population getting out of control & it sounds like it is well on the way in some areas. I just don't think individuals should be adding more pigs to wild. However they get there.
 
Susan Monroe
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Yes, all those feral pigs are domestic pigs that have escaped or were turned loose.  There is only one native wild pig in the U.S., the peccary.

Anyone who skimps on their pig fencing will be adding to the feral pig problem.

PROTECT WILDERNESS AREAS -- EAT FERAL PIGS!

Sue
 
Leah Sattler
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one of ournew neighbors just brought home some baby feral pigs to feed out and butcher mmmm. I'm going to have to get to know those folks a little better

I have seen video of wild pig hunts. they hunted them on mules for safety I believe. those folks took the danger quite seriously i can see why the dogs would have to be just a little cuckoo. pit bulls would fit the bill.
 
paul wheaton
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If nothing else, I think it is a damn good idea to study what they eat.  There is a great lesson in permaculture here.

 
Leah Sattler
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paul wheaton wrote:
If nothing else, I think it is a damn good idea to study what they eat. 




I think the whole problem is.............they eat everything!
 
paul wheaton
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In the omnivore's dilemma, they were eating acorns. 

 
Leah Sattler
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i suppose like any animal they have a list of preferences. nuts of any kind are yummy. they compete with deer and turkey for acorns for sure. but they are voracious omnivores which is a large part of the reason they are so destructive. there is a sign up at the feed store I now frequent for hog removal services in the area. 
 
Susan Monroe
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"there is a sign up at the feed store I now frequent for hog removal services..."

Call and ask how much they get for the meat!

After this thread started, I had a RR crew on board that were talking about feral pigs.  One was deer hunting last fall with his buddy, and with rifles in hand, they watched a group of feral pigs rooting around.

"I wonder what the season is for pigs," asked my conductor. "They should make some pretty good eating."

On their way out of the area (with no deer), they met a game warden and he asked that question.

"There is no season except all year", said the game warden.  "Any time you see 'em, you shoot 'em, with our blessing."

The guys were somewhat upset that they missed out on a great opportunity.

Sue
 
Leah Sattler
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its the same way here. open season all year

trichinoses used to be a pretty big concern with the meat but I don't know if that is still the case.
 
Susan Monroe
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Trichinosis has always been an issue with pigs and pork, and wild game, esp bear. 

Cook the meat thoroughly and it won't be an issue.  Pork roasts and thicker meat should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165F.

"Freezing pork less than 6 inches thick for 20 days at 5 °F (−15 °C) or three days at −4 °F (−20 °C) kills larval worms."  HOWEVER, this does NOT WORK for the species found in wild game. (Wikipedia)

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):  "Curing (salting), drying, smoking, or microwaving meat does not consistently kill infective worms."

Cook it all thoroughly and you won't have any worries.

Sue
 
Leah Sattler
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I knew that  some wild game had some particular reason why it was bad in realation to trcichinoses and that explains it.  I have a feeling they can't sell it though.

quick google turned up

" NOTE: Game species raised on farms under appropriate regulations can be sold. Wild game species, that can be legally hunted under Federal or State regulatory authority, cannot be sold, but can be harvested for personal consumption. If you have questions about the harvest of wild game species, contact your State fish and wildlife agencies, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for Federal regulations on migratory species."

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Farm_Raised_Game/index.asp

that is what I suspected. you don't see anyone selling wild venison, duck or pig for sale ever.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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