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stem rot fungicide: chamomile tea

 
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Using vinegar as an herbicide reminded me of a fantastic natural fungicide for seedlings: chamomile tea.

One summer I worked on a farm that grew dried flowers. The gal was attempting to be as sustainable as possible and did a little test of chemical fungicide versus the chamomile tea and the tea prevented seedling stem rot just as well, if not better than the chemical! I've used it too, with great results.
 
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"Seedling stem rot"... is that the same as damping off, where young seedlings rot at the soil line and fall over and die?

If so, that is a nice thing to know.  Did she use just regular chamomile tea from the grocery store?

Sue
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Yes, Sue, sorry if I used the wrong term - it was for damping off. And yes, she did use just regular chamomile tea from the store. 
 
Susan Monroe
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I don't suppose it will prevent cats from walking carefully down the row of recently potted tomato seedlings, will it? 

Sue
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Dang cats! I hear cats don't like citrus, so maybe if you mixed orange essence in with the chamomile! Ha. Just being goofy, 'cuz I'm really not sure what the citrus might do to the poor seedlings.
 
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that is a great tidbit to have in the gardening arsenal! I wonder if it would work for fungus on peach trees? my poor peaches at my other house would turn black and shrivel due to some fungus.

sue- I feel your pain. cats and seedlings don't mix well. 
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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It might work on the peach tree fungus - I don't know. I'm pretty sure it wouldn't hurt to try it!

I used to have a baking soda recipe for a spray that controlled black spot on roses. (Lots of fungus, mold and mildew here in the NW!). It might have included a bit of soap to help it stick to the leaves, but I can't find the recipe at the moment. Though Sue mentioned in the acidic soil thread that baking soda can add salt to the soil, so I'm not sure if that's not the best option.
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