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Recommended books?  RSS feed

 
Nate Coffey
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I am just curious what books people recommend around here. I have a good general book but not really about permaculture specifically.

The Self-Sufficient Life and how to live it. by John Seymour.

I am looking for great books about techniques covered in these forums. I am interested in books on crafts (woodworking, soap, candles, pottery, etc.), woodlot care, companion planting, animal care (rotating pastures like Joel Salatin).

I have the following in my wish list on Amazon;

The One-Straw Revolution - Masanobu Fukoka
Four-Season Harvest - Eliot Coleman
gaia's garden - Toby Hemenway
Permaculture: A designers manual - Bill Mollison

Are there any important books I am missing?
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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all really great choices..

the quintessential book on the items you mentioned is

The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery

just finished reading it last month, excellent book, this one you'll want a copy of not just a borrow from the library
 
John Polk
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Another one to consider is "Tree Crops" by J. Russell Smith.

It is a free download at the site I linked to.
 
Lori Crouch
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Location: Amarillo, TX.
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I'm reading volume 2 of "Edible Forest Gardens" by Dave Jacke. I also finished reading "Root Cellering" by Mike and Nancy Bubel over the winter. It has a lot of great information in it about what crops to plant when and how to get them to last longer past the growing season, recipes, and other things. I also have a water storage book and several books on making just about anything from scratch. I would like to get "Gaia's Garden" and Bill Mollison's permaculture book, but those will be in the distant future.
 
Allan Laal
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Location: Estonia
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any good book recommendations about ponds/dams and other permaculturish water features?
 
greg patrick
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Location: SoCal, USDA Zone 10b
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I just received Jo Robbinson's 'Pasture Perfect'.
PIG PERFECT, Peter Kaminsky, 2005
Haven't read it yet because it isn't yet released, but i've pre-ordered: The Good Food Revolution http://www.indiebound.org/book/9781592407101
 
wayne stephen
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Don't forget the Foxfire series.
 
John Polk
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Allan Laal wrote:any good book recommendations about ponds/dams and other permaculturish water features?


For permaculture style earthworks, I don't think anything can trump Brad Lancaster's series:
"Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond".

It is a three volume set (books sold individually...you don't need to buy all 3 volumes). Volume 1 deals with the principles of retaining, and utilizing water on your property. Vol. 2 is the nuts-and-bolts of constructing earthworks. A lot of Vol. 1 is duplicated here. Vol. 1 currently sells for $30-50 per copy, but a 2nd edition is in the works, and it can be pre-ordered for about $21. Don't buy the older, more expensive copy unless you NEED that info TODAY (2nd edition is bound to have updated info). Vol. 2 covers a lot of what is in Vol.1, but vol.1 has a lot of detail that is priceless for understanding the entire process. Volume 3 (which I have never seen/read) deals primarily with roof catchment and cisterns. Tons of plans and info exist for free around the www on the subject.

Bottom line: Unless you live in a rain forest, at least get Volume 2 (it could even benefit you in a rain forest).
Brad Lancaster lives (and grows) in Tuscon, AZ, yet less than 20% of the water his family uses comes through the meter.

 
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