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Where are the bees?

 
Chris Holcombe
Posts: 97
Location: Zone 8b Portland
food preservation forest garden fungi
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I'm in eastern pennsylvania and I see tons of flowers on my kale, goumi's, apples, strawberries, blue honeysuckle, etc. Only problem is I don't see a single bee going to see them. Anyone else notice this also? Last year the plants flowered a little later in the season. Maybe things are just happening a little too early this year. What's your thoughts?
 
Susanna de Villareal-Quintela
Posts: 143
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We have honeybees and peach trees, flowers, etc. I have noticed the bees are not flying too far from the hive and are not working the unseasonally flowering fruit trees, yet.
 
Shawn Harper
Posts: 360
Location: Portlandia, Oregon
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My parents have a hive in he niebors tree that visits them, but none of my stuffs been visited.
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 400
Location: Georgia
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My blueberries bloomed early and got plenty of attention. I had trouble last year with birds so I put
up a net system and was pleased to see the honey bees could go and come easily and the bumble
and carpenter bees had no trouble getting in and were able to squeeze out barely. I am in Georga.
 
William James
gardener
Posts: 1010
Location: Northern Italy
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I'm planning to drill holes into some short logs, or group a bunch of cane poles together, and create some "natural" bee-houses this year.

I think if gardeners took the lead on making a home for their pollinators, this would be less of a problem. It's seems pretty easy to provide habitat.

And then there's always the "bee hotel" but that's a little beyond me.

http://www.foxleas.com/bee_house.htm

best,
William

ps: I just bought some comfrey seeds for them to suck on some day.
 
Susanna de Villareal-Quintela
Posts: 143
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William James wrote:
I think if gardeners took the lead on making a home for their pollinators, this would be less of a problem. It's seems pretty easy to provide habitat.



For this season, I don't think it's just an issue of habitat. Our dandelions have only just begun to bloom but our fruit trees were in full glory almost 4 weeks ago. It is not "typical" for fruit trees in Michigan to be in full bloom in early-March with the snow crocus (I'm guessing Pennsylvania is not much different). Fruit trees in my area typically bloom in late April to early May. This year is a challenge for orchards because not only did the trees flower early, they flowered before many other "habitat" plants. Plants that would help draw those bees/polinators to the fruit trees.

In addition to the lack of bees, there is a lack of other pollinators. The warm days but freezing nights is not healthy for our helpful little buggers... especially when they have no protective cover to buffer the cold nights. adly, in my area, the tree crops are going to be impacted in a negative way. If I get any fruit out of my orchard I'll jump for joy!

As for our bees, they are staying close to their traditional foods for this time of year, those early leafers who throw pollen to the wind in copious quantity.



 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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we don't have a hive here, but there are people that put hives out in neighboring properties, but they haven't put them out yet..so the blossoms here are all being pollinated by "wild bees" of all sorts, although I have seen some honeybees so I assume we have a bee tree somewhere on or near our property...we have left some aspen snags up that have been dead for years, so I assume maybe they are hives.
 
Christian McMahon
Posts: 72
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Bee's are all over my citrus here in CA. My question is where are all the ladybugs? Last year I didn't even see one. I almost always have to at least rescue them from the pool on a regular basis. I am going to plant ladybug attracting plants.
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