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Tree Id

 
gardener
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I have a bunch of these little trees,  I think they might be beech?
IMG_20200509_085339.jpg
Bark
Bark
IMG_20200509_085329.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20200509_085329.jpg]
 
master pollinator
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We have a lot of beech. The leaves look similar, but the bark on all of ours, large and small, is quite smooth, like the smaller tree in your photo. Quite unlike the larger tree. Were you referring to the larger tree with bumpy bark?

I don’t have another guess on the bumpy one!
 
William Bronson
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I also have one of these,  I think it might be a Paulownia tomentosa
IMG_20200509_085639.jpg
Bark
Bark
IMG_20200509_085628.jpg
Leaves
Leaves
 
William Bronson
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Anne, yes,  it's the bumpy one.
I'll check the other trees,  see if they are smoother...
 
pollinator
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Also might be Morus rubra. Freaking spell check this too 5 min to type
 
Anne Pratt
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Tj Jefferson wrote:Also might be Morus rubra. Freaking spell check this too 5 min to type



Spellcheck, autocorrect.  Sent from the devil!
 
William Bronson
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At first I was like "Mulberry, nah,  they have mittens for keaves"
Then I looked,  and sure enough red mulberry often has few or no "mitten" leaves.
The leaves do resemble red mulberry.
I'm still studying the bark.
 
pollinator
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first one's a hackberry.

second one either paulownia or catawba
 
pollinator
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The bark on the first one does resemble hackberry. But the leaves are way too big in that second photo. Even fullsize trees have tiny leaves.

The second photo, the leaves looks like paper mulberry. A slightly invasive but lightly fruiting variety.
 
J Davis
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Also, look up devils walking stick.
 
greg mosser
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there are several hackberry species. i have definitely seen plenty of them with decent-sized leaves. paper mulberry usually shows some variation in leaf shape (at least a few mittens).

seems to me to have single leaves on branching twigs, not bipinnate leaves like an aralia (devil's walking stick).
 
pollinator
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First one is rose of sharon, second one is mulberry, third one is catalpa, hope that helps.
 
William Bronson
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Thanks for all the thoughtful replies.
Greg,  I think you nailed it.
I have been back to the property since,  and I think I have found momma hackberry.
There is a mature Catalpa of some sort located less than a block away.
I'm not sure if it's Catalpa bignoniodes (southern catalpa) and Catalpa speciosa (northern catalpa).
Weird thing,  I've found these trees sprouting up in various places,  but what spreads them?
It's not clear what eats the pods.

I will definitely try to transplant all of the trees, the Catalpa for future fence posts and the hackberry for food.
The rose of Sharon makes a decent hedge, and the flowers are both edible and beloved by bees.
I'm hoping to find some black walnut saplings to dig up and sell.
The momma black walnut is just now leafing out,  so saplings should be leafing soon or already have.
They are easier to ID,  by crushing/sniffing the leaves.

Thanks  for all the help!
 
Dan Allen
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The way to tell if its southern catalpa, i.e. speciosa, is by the way the leaves come out in a whorl of three leaves. Based on that I would say it's the southern.
 
William Bronson
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I have another tree to ask about.
I'm pretty sure it's a black locust.
It has thorns,  but not big, yet,  and not thorns on the thorns,  which evidently is a characteristic of honey locust.
IMG_20200512_194920.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20200512_194920.jpg]
IMG_20200512_194907.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20200512_194907.jpg]
 
greg mosser
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yep! black locust.
 
William Bronson
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Cool, thanks!
Now to get it out of my tiny  front yard!
I'll pull it up,  if I can,  if not,  maybe I'll airlayer it and cut it.
I see it will grow from cuttings,  would it grow from a stake?
 
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