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Trifoliate Orangeade

 
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I have done some reading about the trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) and I'm considering growing this hardy citrus where I live in Ohio. Based on what I have heard about the fruit, it is very sour so I want to know if anyone has ever tried making orange-ade from the fruit of this tree as with lemons and limes. If the fruit has a higher acidity than lemons (pH=2-3), than it might require more dilution than lemons. The only issue with juicing trifoliate oranges I have heard about so far is that some fruits may leave a piney resin on a lemon squeezer that is hard to wash off. Based on what I have read, the fruits are supposed to be the size of key limes except full of seeds.
 
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Its not sour like lime, its more bitter like grapefruit.
So grapefruit without any juice just pulp, thats gummy+oily. It is really only good as a spice(alcohol/cake/cooking/etc) or to make jam/marmalade.
 
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I have harvested it, and tasted the juice.
I found it to be grapefruit like, very tasty, and not bitter or even overly tart,  but I also eat lemons out of hand.

There is tree (bush) growing right near my university campus.
I found rolling it between two hard surfaces increased the juice released.
I'm not sure about the resin, I really didn't notice it.
I think it must be in the rind.
I tried to grow it from seed and cuttings,  but this spring I bought one from the Growing Value Permaculture nursery, here in town.

There are some studies that warn about the dangers of using the extracts of this plant, but given its history of use,  I'm not too worried.
I won't be concentrating the pulp or juice so much as I will be diluting it.
I plan on using the pulp  for juice and using that juice for drinks and for pickling.
I will be squeezing  each orange  and cooking the left over bits down for the oil/resin.
That product will be tested for flammability,  usefulness as a natural glue,  pest  deterrent, etc.
Evidently the resin is soluble in alcohol, but not easily removed by water.



 
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recent video i watched on trifoliate-aid  
 

i wouldnt worry about getting sick from it, but dont drink too much the first time
 
pollinator
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I find the resinous taste disagreeable but perhaps that perception will vary from one person to the next.  

It is a very interesting plant and quite hardy!  It can be propagated easily by the numerous seed in each fruit (don't let them dry out before planting) and has been used in both hybridization and as rootstocks for grafting to generate hardier citrus plants.  https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs221
 
Ryan M Miller
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C. West wrote:recent video i watched on trifoliate-aid  

 

i wouldnt worry about getting sick from it, but dont drink too much the first time



Given the introduction to this video and the reports of the fruits occasionally yielding a sticky resin when squeezed, the adverse reaction to the fruit the guy's girlfriend had may have been triggered by an allergic reaction to one or more aromatic compounds in the fruit. Turpentine, a traditional paint thinner for oil painters, is a similar sibstance rich in aromatic compounds. Many artists have such severe allergic reactions to turpentine that they cannot use the substance even in a well-ventilated studio. Keep in mind also that there actually is such a thing as a citrus allergy, so it already would not be a good idea to try eating trifoliate oranges if you already have a citrus allergy.
 
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Ryan M Miller wrote:I have done some reading about the trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) and I'm considering growing this hardy citrus where I live in Ohio. Based on what I have heard about the fruit, it is very sour so I want to know if anyone has ever tried making orange-ade from the fruit of this tree as with lemons and limes. If the fruit has a higher acidity than lemons (pH=2-3), than it might require more dilution than lemons. The only issue with juicing trifoliate oranges I have heard about so far is that some fruits may leave a piney resin on a lemon squeezer that is hard to wash off. Based on what I have read, the fruits are supposed to be the size of key limes except full of seeds.



I recently purchased lemon squeezer. Now i can easily make trifoliate. As i purchased Prepworks by Progressive Dome  so it remove piney resin and it easily wash off. Thanks to that guide which help in selecting  best one for me.
I liked there Things to consider when buying a lime squeezer section which helps me a lot
 
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It is more like grapefruit concentrace and its pretty shelf stable.

To get the most juice, put the fruit in freezer for a few hours then thaw, repeat as needed. It breaks down the pulp, releases more juice, and generally results in a more pleasant juice.

Never had a bad reaction to it.
 
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