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Any Tips For Freezing Flour?

 
master steward
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So several years ago when dear hubby was on a corn beef kick we could not find rye bread for making Reuben Sandwiches.  I bought a 5lb bag of rye flour and stuck it in the fridge like this picture:



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Will it be okay?  How would I thaw it out?  I am imagining a sold block of something like plaster.

What are the best containers to use to keep it in the freezer?  I really like ones with large openings like the folgers coffee containers that I use for all purpose flour.  I just don't know if the lids are good for freezing.



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Or I have these though I don't like the top as well because the opening is smaller:



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When I get ready to put it back in the freezer would it be best to put it in a plastic bag?
 
gardener
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This is all based on my experience:

Flour doesn't freeze solid because it's dry. You can open a bag, scoop out what you need and reseal.  Your goal in packaging it to freeze is keeping it as dry and sealed as possible. You want to keep moisture and freezer odors / taste out. I'll usually freeze in the original packaging (when available) inside one or two freezer bags. Squeezing as much air out as possible. Vacuum sealing is even better.

I think those containers could work too, especially as an outer protective layer. You definitely don't want tiny holes poked in the wrapping.
 
pollinator
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Sonja Draven wrote:Flour doesn't freeze solid because it's dry.



Freezing is actually the preferred method for long term storage, even if it will not stay in the freezer.  Hard freezing for a few week (sub 0) or light freezing for 6 weeks will kill any potential infestation at a later date; and increase shelf life significantly.  It will bake the same as normal and does not need to be 'defrosted'.  It will come up to room temp fairly quickly after you measure out your need.  Then cook/bake as normal.
 
Sonja Draven
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Great additions, Jack! Agreed.
 
pollinator
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SI have made smaller bags from butcher paper that will hold 2 lbs. and weighed it out and froze four that way.  I made a flour glue with water to hold the bag together but when dried I did put on some tape on the seems just to be sure. I then put them in zip lock plastic bags, probably not necessary but I thought it might keep the freezer burn taste off the flour and I have never had any trouble.  you might be able to use paper lunch bags instead of making your own.  or I have a few times cut sheet of parchment paper and lined zip lock bags with it so the flour was not in direct contact with the plastic. You could just put it in the zip-lock bags  I just didn't want the flour touching the plastic. And it does help keep it fresher tasting when you have it in paper first I think.It seems to last in the freezer months longer and still taste and cook better then without the paper bags.  you could probably put a whole 5 lb bag in and be fine.  I just wanted smaller portions I could pull out when needed.  I usually keep wheat grains in mylar bags or jars and grind what i need at the time.  And do keep some of the grains in the freezer too.  And always put the grains in the freezer before I store them to kill off any eggs or little hitchhikers I don't want in my grains.   I will leave the grain in the freezer for 5 days and then let it sit out and make sure it is dry before storing it for long term. whether in Mylar or jars.  Sometimes I sprout the grains  and then dehydrate them before storing too.    Sprouted grains are easier for people to digest especially if someone has a gluten intolerance. As I do and many in my family do.  I also try and get Einkorn wheat  or other ancient grains as they have less gluten naturally and have not been hybridized so much.  more like the grains people first ate.
 
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Last time I froze flour it was a 40lb bag, I put the entire paper bag it came in and the box it had been posted in into the freezer and there it stayed slowly going down for a year, after it was about 75% empty I moved it into a couple of large plastic freezer bags to save space, after 18months it was just the same as when it went in.
 
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