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My last biochar question. I promise!

 
pollinator
Posts: 255
Location: Sierra Nevada Foothills, Zone 7b
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Hi there,

What is the "shelf life" of charged but unused biochar? If I create it, charge it up with a fungal-dominant compost tea, a bit of minerals and some nitrogen, how long will it stay good in a 5 gallon bucket? Does it need to breathe? Stay moist? Stay cool/warm?

Thanks again,

Dan
 
pollinator
Posts: 859
Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
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Hi Dan. I often let charged biochar sit around for weeks at least before I get it all into the ground or pots. I tend to store it in either barrels or bags, usually in an old wool fadge. These are a little bit breathable and let excess water drain away, so if the stuff gets rained on it doesn't end up submerged. I would think that as long as it's aerated and doesn't dry out or get really hot or cold that the wee beasties will be quite happy in the porous structure.
 
Dan Fish
pollinator
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Location: Sierra Nevada Foothills, Zone 7b
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Hey thanks Phil! Not only did you answer my question but that is the exact answer I wanted hear! Hahahha, thanks again.
 
Phil Stevens
pollinator
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Whenever I catch myself getting worried about soil microbiology, I remind myself that bacteria and fungi are globetrotters. Soil life has been found in air samples taken at the tops of the Himalaya. If they land somewhere habitable they will flourish, and this is why that rich soil smell is pretty much a constant no matter where you go...it's the same major families of bacteria and fungi, just varying in local composition according to what they're living in.
 
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Hey Dan,
I pretty much agree with Phil and wouldn't worry about it too much. I'm usually just excited to get it into the ground and helping distribute microbes and nutrients.

Don't worry about asking too many questions.  Often, when someone asks a good question, someone like Bryant Redhawk will answer and improve all of our understandings of the topic.
John S
PDX OR
 
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