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Canning lacto-fermented vegetables?

 
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I've started exploring lacto-fermentation, but I'm quickly running out of fridge space to keep the end result from over-fermenting once it's done.

I'd like to explore canning to make some of my fermentations shelf-stable (at the cost of some probiotics and texture, I know.). I've found clear information for sauerkraut from a reputable source (https://extension.psu.edu/lets-preserve-sauerkraut) but not for things like fermented carrots or mixed vegetables.

Any ideas? Personal experience with that?

I guess, historically, that people had a root cellar or an uninsulated attic to store their fermentations over longer periods of time.  But for me, in my current setting, the "long term storage" of ferments is essentially null (It's not like I'm in the habit of losing cabbage or carrots in the fridge. They practically last forever in their natural form.)
 
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Location: Seattle burbs
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I'm interested in this too. So far, everyone I've asked has told me I shouldn't, that it kills the beneficial bacteria. But I definitely still want to do it because, for instance, even killed-bacteria fermented hot sauce is tastier than non-fermented any day (like Tabasco...it's slow-fermented and then pasteurized before being shelf-stable bottled...and the twang of the ferment still shines through.) And also, like you, I can only store so much in my fridge!

So I'll be watching this thread too. :-)
 
Kena Landry
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L Allen wrote:But I definitely still want to do it because, for instance, even killed-bacteria fermented hot sauce is tastier than non-fermented any day



Yeah. I'm not eating food because of the probiotics - the bacteria are a nice bonus at best.
 
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Location: Western Kentucky
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The fermentation process should preserve the food, though there may be some foods with different chemicals or ph or something that simply may not keep. I have fermented stuff in a bail-top jar that I have kept at least a year that seems fine, though I cannot guarantee it's safe. From what I've read, if it is dangerous to eat, it will defi itely smell/taste that way. That's the guide I use. I believe the key would be to treat it like yeast fermentation in wine or beer. Cleanliness is next to godliness. With the bail-top jar, there is no chance for any contamination from the point of fermentation on, due to the fact it is sealed the whole time, and it should even have positive pressure when stored if the rubber seal is good.
 
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Location: Zone 8a
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See if this guide offers what you are looking for;

https://www.healthycanning.com/wp-content/uploads/USDA-Complete-Guide-to-Home-Canning-2015-revision.pdf

 
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