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How I preserve excess dill

 
Posts: 13
Location: Southwest Mississippi, USA zone 8
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I don't know if anyone has mentioned this way to store dill for next years pickles. I always have lots of dill still growing after I have finished this years pickles and hate to just throw it on the compost heap. I have tried freezing and dehydrating but it never seems to have the punch that fresh dill has. Now I put it in pint jars and cover with pure vinegar. A six minute waterbath and It is shelf stable for several years. I only use one tablespoon per quart of pickles as it is very strongly flavored. It cannot be detected that you did not use fresh dill. A little when fermenting pickles give them an extra zing, too. I also use it in some salad dressings and when making a stew with wild game.
 
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Location: King William, VA
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I find this interesting Bob, as I'm sitting here looking at a 10 foot long row of dill that is ready to go to seed.

So are you saying that you give the dill a water bath and THEN store in vinegar?
 
pollinator
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So you're making a strongly flavoured dill vinegar? That's an excellent idea! my dill is never ready at the same time as the cucumbers, dill is ready now, cucumbers are only a few inches high.
 
Bob Waur
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Joshua LeDuc wrote:I find this interesting Bob, as I'm sitting here looking at a 10 foot long row of dill that is ready to go to seed.

So are you saying that you give the dill a water bath and THEN store in vinegar?



Joshua, I place the dill in vinegar and then waterbath it. I prefer the seed heads over the 'weed', gives a stronger flavor. With a10 foot row you should be all set for the next 5+ years!
 
Bob Waur
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Skandi Rogers wrote:So you're making a strongly flavored dill vinegar? That's an excellent idea! my dill is never ready at the same time as the cucumbers, dill is ready now, cucumbers are only a few inches high.



Yes. My cucumbers are rarely ready when the dill is. That is what prompted me to try this. I use the vinegar and throw in a piece of the dill so it 'looks' like dill pickles too.
 
Joshua LeDuc
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Yes, great idea.  I'm going to try this!
 
pollinator
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I do this with mint and tarragon and use them as a salad dressing base, and with thyme to add to sauces and stews.  I don't water bath it though--I usually blend them up in the blender and pour them back in the original bottle.  The internet thinks I might get botulism if I keep it on the shelf this way, but if you strain the leaves out after a couple weeks of infusing, it's safe.  I'm not sure how long the flavor will last in this case, the longest I've kept them for is a year (with the mint).

I definitely try it with dill when I get enough :)
 
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Bob Waur wrote: I use the vinegar and throw in a piece of the dill so it 'looks' like dill pickles too.



That goes part way to answering the question that I have.  I was wondering if you use the "green matter" from your infused vinegar jars or just the vinegar.  I'm also wondering how tightly you back the herb in the jars.  Is it a matter of cramming in as much as will fit, or loosely filling the jar, or... ?
 
Bob Waur
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Dan Boone wrote:

Bob Waur wrote: I use the vinegar and throw in a piece of the dill so it 'looks' like dill pickles too.



That goes part way to answering the question that I have.  I was wondering if you use the "green matter" from your infused vinegar jars or just the vinegar.  I'm also wondering how tightly you back the herb in the jars.  Is it a matter of cramming in as much as will fit, or loosely filling the jar, or... ?



I pack it in pretty tightly to half way full and then pour in the vinegar. This gives a good dill flavor and there is a reasonable amount of flavored vinegar to use.
 
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