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Growing Paw Paws Naturally

 
gardener
Posts: 1946
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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I wanted to make this thread to help me keep track of and document growing paw paws naturally, with very little work and hopefully huge harvests!

Hopefully it can be helpful to others also!
 
Steve Thorn
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This paw paw is a few years old and is really starting to get big and putting on a lot of new growth. I hope to get the first fruit next year.

Paw paws have a neat kinda tropical look to me.
20200710_182957.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200710_182957.jpg]
 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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This sucker is coming up from the roots of the paw paw above. It has grown a few feet already this first year.

I hope to transplant it to the food forest once it goes dormant this fall, to have a new paw paw tree.
20200710_183010.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200710_183010.jpg]
 
pollinator
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Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
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Steve Thorn wrote:This paw paw is a few years old and is really starting to get big and putting on a lot of new growth. I hope to get the first fruit next year.

Paw paws have a neat kinda tropical look to me.



When you say "a few years old," exactly how many years are you talking about? I planted mine last year when they were about a foot and a half tall, and they don't look anywhere near as good as yours does. They've put on maybe six inches of growth, but they haven't leafed out much at all. Now I'm wondering if I should be worried about them.
 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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I wouldn't be worried. It seems like paw paws take a while to get adjusted after being transplanted.

The one above is probably 5 years old I would guess.

It was about year three before it really started to thrive, if I'm remembering correctly. It seemed to really like a good leaf mulch.

It's finally growing pretty fast now, and hopefully will produce some paw paws next year.
 
Diane Kistner
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Steve Thorn wrote:I wouldn't be worried. It seems like paw paws take a while to get adjusted after being transplanted.

The one above is probably 5 years old I would guess.

It was about year three before it really started to thrive, if I'm remembering correctly. It seemed to really like a good leaf mulch.

It's finally growing pretty fast now, and hopefully will produce some paw paws next year.



Ah, good. I'm relieved. I've got three pawpaws for my pawpaw patch planted in dappled shade, and by the time they get big enough to need more sun, I'm hoping to have saved up the money to get more pines down. We've already had 46 trees taken down, some of which I was able to do myself but most of them $$$ endeavors. I'm really, really, really looking forward to having pawpaws!

 
pollinator
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Location: the mountains of western nc
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i'm starting to see next year's flowerbuds on my pawpaws - at this stage they're very obvious round buds as opposed to the long thin leafbuds. have you been getting flowers yet, steve?
 
Steve Thorn
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I had a handful of flowers two years ago and they fell off. This spring, there were about 30 flowers or so, and a handful of tiny paw paws started forming but they fell off. I think the tree still wasn't big enough to support them, but it should be able to next year.
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