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How to use a flick carder to prepare wool for spinning into yarn

 
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Advantages of a flick carder?
- affordable
- portable
- worsted or woollen prep
- fast!!!

When to use a flick card?
- when the wool or fibre has a 'lock' structure so you can securely hold one end and flick the other.
 
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May I ask (as someone who hadn't done any of them) what makes the flicking method your preference?
 
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It looks like maybe the flicking method is faster--it sure looks more fun!

I have regular cards, the kind you use two at the same time. I often find myself doing the "almost-carding" when I'm mixing a few colors of roving together in small batches. It just feels faster to use one, rather than two, because I don't have to keep reaching for the other card.

I never would have thought to brush with it! Does it wear away at your clothes to brush the roving?
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote: I never would have thought to brush with it! Does it wear away at your clothes to brush the roving?



A leather apron would be a good way to protect your clothing😉
 
r ranson
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Yes, I usually put a cloth over my clothes.
I carry the flick carder and fibre in a little cotton bag like   I sell with the flick carder in my etsy shop



I use this to protect my clothes against detritus and damage, but the problem is white fibre on a white background doesn't show up well on camera.
 
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I don't do this myself, but if I did I would use the flicking method. That's how you get tangles out of human hair, so that makes sense to me. I had to mute it, haha, didn't like the music.
 
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