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Marjoram - what to do with it?  RSS feed

 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
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Posts: 1422
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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I have tons of wonderful oregano and then I have this one patch of Marjoram. It is growing REALLY well but - compared to the oregano - it is rather bland.

I'm feeling like it is taking up valuable space another plant could be using.

Any input from Marjoram lovers? Does it have a use that I am overlooking?
 
Kat deZwart
Posts: 108
Location: Limburg, Netherlands, sandy loam
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I use the flowers to flavor sugar for use in tea and baking.
They can also be dried for use in tea.

 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
pollinator
Posts: 1422
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Thanks Kat, I'll try that.
 
Morgan Morrigan
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
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I much prefer marjorum to basil. is much better in slow cooked stuff, so it doesn't overpower foods.
Try making a great pesto with it. older leaves have more flavor.
 
Ivan Weiss
Posts: 179
Location: Vashon WA, near Seattle and Tacoma
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Where I live (Seattle-Tacoma area), marjoram is a self-seeding invasive ground cover, for which I am grateful. Once we butcher the last of the hogs next week, I'll be transplanting clumps of it into all corners of that field. Pre-fertilized with pig poop, it should spread like crazy.

Cattle, hogs, and chickens all eat it readily. The bees love it when it blooms. I season stews and meat dishes with it. When I made scrapple a couple weeks ago, the recipe called for marjoram. I picked it fresh and added it to the mix. It turned out wonderfully.

I wouldn't have thought marjoram was so useful. I never gave a hoot in hell about it until I observed how it spread all over my garden. Now I want to make it an integral part of my design.
 
Peta Schroder
Posts: 62
Location: Australia
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I love marjoram in horta. I fry green veggies and edible weeds until just wilted in butter or olive oil with the water still clinging from a wash. Add garlic and a little tomato paste and mix with the greens, add fresh lemon juice at the last minute then add any kind of chopped Mediterranean herb as the heat is turned off. I'm quite partial to marjoram, it really rounds out the flavour nicely. Try it, it's one of my favourite meals, and said to be the favourite of many long-living Greeks!!
 
Adam Old
Posts: 18
Location: Miami, FL - Zone 10b
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Marjoram is good for most anything oregano is good for.

One thing i like it in is a Mexican dish, I just know as "rajas" (means rags) made out of poblano peppers. basically grill or broil poblano chiles until their skin blisters and comes off the chile meat but not too long. Flip them a few times so they are evenly done, rinse under cold water and remove seeds stems and skins. then chop the chiles lengthwise into rags. sautee an onion, mushrooms and garlic, add the poblanos and marjoram, then simmer in some stock until it evaporates. I finish with cream and some white oaxaca cheese, but you can do without dairy too. serve as tacos or on meat.

yum
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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It is easy to 'over do it' with oregano. You will end up with a bitter dish.
Marjoram is much milder, hence not as likely to overpower your meal. Even if over done, the meal is not ruined.
 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
pollinator
Posts: 1422
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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I can't get enough oregano, the stronger the better and hubby gets upset when we run out of our home grown.

But I never thought about transplanting this stuff to the 'wild' areas - more variety for the birds. I am also going to try the pesto, oregano would be too strong for that I'm sure. A friend recently made a squash leaf pesto for me that was amazing - bet marjoram would be good in that too.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Marjoram always dies on me, I'm jealous
It's really good with eggs and dairy.
I think it's rubbish dried, unlike oregano which actually improves.
I'd get it into that wild area, along with other Mediterranean herbs. The insects will be overjoyed!
I'm going to transplant more rosemary, oregano, sage and thyme 'out the front' and hopefully start doing swaps for coffee with my local cafe
Pesto would be great, especially if you had herbs like basil/parsley to tone it down.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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