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getting plastic out of our life

 
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I was watching an old old movie last night supposedly filmed on the Tennessee river, the water was clear and clean looking and could not stop thinking about a story on the local news not long ago that said the Tennessee river is the most polluted on earth contaminated with plastic mostly from broken down plastic bags. seems that here in the lower 48 one of the growth industries is plastic, plastic everything. and now everyone and their brother wants a 3d printer, more plastic to make more plastic stuff. even the latest greatest fast food containers that were supposed to be compostable plastic are now found to be highly toxic.
is there really anyway to get plastic out of our lives?
 
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I think, as individuals, we can make a difference.  I cannot directly control the plastic my neighbor uses.  I can control the plastic I use. I can indirectly influence the plastic my neighbor uses.  I was shopping for an appliance yesterday that is normally made of plastic.  I found one made of metal.  I researched the product and company.  I will be buying it.  In the process, I will have eliminated an added plastic product in my home. I will have benefited a company that uses less plastic.  I will have benefited the company selling it.  And, however minutely, I will have weakened companies making a similar product of plastic. I do not see plastic as evil. I do have problems with the misuse of it.....and the over use of it.  
 
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I try to reuse as much of the plastic I use and the ones I find from my neighbors as possible.

I use them to grow plants. Recently grew corn to harvest in a stack of plastic bottles.

https://youtu.be/8YAV_k_9n80
 
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There are many things that we  can do over time. One is to make and use beeswax wraps instead of plastic bags for food.  Another is to reuse fabric bags at the grocery store.
JOhn S
PDX OR
 
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I m a beginner I started to reduce my plastic waste and I stopped using disposable coffee capsules I bought reusable capsule 2 months ago and I very satisfied 😊
https://www.edenlly.com/kitchen/stainless-steel-nespresso-capsule.html
 
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Lola Akinola wrote:I try to reuse as much of the plastic I use and the ones I find from my neighbors as possible.

I use them to grow plants. Recently grew corn to harvest in a stack of plastic bottles.

https://youtu.be/8YAV_k_9n80



The Youtube links does not work anymore.
 
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I stopped buying meat at the supermarket and plan on spending half an hour at the butcher shop. I figure I can sacrifice time to help the planet. Plus I take my own tupper ware containers everywhere - even for meat, not to mention for flour,  grains etc at our local organic store. And a cloth bag for bread.
 
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I  keep a heavier plastic bag that folds perfectly flat in my purse so I am always ready with my own bag.  I have cloth reusable bags too but don’t always have one with me  on some shopping stops.  I reuse plastic containers however I can. One way is using the takeout container with a clear lid to start seedlings and for micro greens.  Plastic trays are great for under plants. I am becoming more reactive to packaging, choosing products without it.  Plastic milk jugs can be cut to become scoops. Most important, bring home less.
 
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A game changer for me in reducing plastic waste has been vacuum sealing dry goods in recycled glass jars. I buy in bulk, and vacuum it at home.
Many things like flour can be bought in paper sacks, but plastic is pretty good at maintaining shelf life. Compared to vacuum storage though, plastics are inefficient, ineffective and completely reduntant.

 
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Andrew Williams wrote:A game changer for me in reducing plastic waste has been vacuum sealing dry goods in recycled glass jars. I buy in bulk, and vacuum it at home.
Many things like flour can be bought in paper sacks, but plastic is pretty good at maintaining shelf life. Compared to vacuum storage though, plastics are inefficient, ineffective and completely reduntant.



That is genius! Thanks for sharing.
 
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Andrew Williams wrote:A game changer for me in reducing plastic waste has been vacuum sealing dry goods in recycled glass jars. I buy in bulk, and vacuum it at home.
Many things like flour can be bought in paper sacks, but plastic is pretty good at maintaining shelf life. Compared to vacuum storage though, plastics are inefficient, ineffective and completely redundant.



I've been doing it for years. Just on a side note , this is my method for that type of lids not sealing;
I place dry, clean folded dish towel in a microwave, heat it on high  for a minute, then take out the dish towel and place the lid/s in between the towel fold to warm up for a bit and place still warm lid on the jar and vacuum seal it.  The rubber gasket seals when the lid is still quite warm. I never had issues of not working.
 
Andrew Williams
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Ela La Salle wrote:

Andrew Williams wrote:A game changer for me in reducing plastic waste has been vacuum sealing dry goods in recycled glass jars. I buy in bulk, and vacuum it at home.
Many things like flour can be bought in paper sacks, but plastic is pretty good at maintaining shelf life. Compared to vacuum storage though, plastics are inefficient, ineffective and completely redundant.



I've been doing it for years. Just on a side note , this is my method for that type of lids not sealing;
I place dry, clean folded dish towel in a microwave, heat it on high  for a minute, then take out the dish towel and place the lid/s in between the towel fold to warm up for a bit and place still warm lid on the jar and vacuum seal it.  The rubber gasket seals when the lid is still quite warm. I never had issues of not working.



Brilliant! I can see a video update coming soon.
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