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Are these oyster mushrooms?

 
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I found these mushrooms growing on an unidentifiable log, likely oak. They have a lot of features consistent with Pleurotus pulmonarius or ostreatus: white spore print, shelflike clustering, decurrent gills, off-center stem, growing on wood, tannish cap color, and their odor.

What's strange to me is their 1.5"- 2" long, thin stems. I've seen this on cultivated oysters, but never in the wild. I'm used to seeing short, stubby stems on oysters. I can't find any pictures or info of oysters with similar stems. But I also can't find any other mushrooms that fit the description better than oysters do. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I just read where summer oysters have a longer, thinner stem than others.  Sure looks like you've got everything else correct!

I'll try to find the post where I saw that.  It's from the Arkansas Mushroom and Fungi facebook group and mentioned by the expert there.

Edit...could not find the post I was looking for, it's a really active site, but here's a link to the page...it is public so you can browse if you are on fb.

I see I forgot to add the link!  here it is https://www.facebook.com/groups/1478737049005422/
 
Daniel Spinelli
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Thank you for your help Judith!
 
gardener
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They sure do look like them. i hope someone comes along and says, sure that's them, but that is not me, even though i've grown them on straw.
If i'm insecure i google dangerous doppelgangers or dangerous look a likes and these terms specified to the area i am.
From the survival world comes this tip, first put a tiny bit on your skin, like inside forearm, wait 24 hrs for bad result, then the tiniest bit on your lip, wait 24 hrs, then hold a bit in your mouth, wait 24 hrs, then swallow a bit, wait 48 hrs. I might be wrong about the hours. But be very careful.  
 
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The only BAD reaction I've had from wild mushrooms was from drinking a beer... a day after I ate the 'shroom. Some mushrooms will react poorly with alcohol, even from kombucha or wild ferment pickles. Be warned.

Mind you, that was from something in the boletus family (aspen bolete), but check your local guide for interactions and contraindications.
 
Judith Browning
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Daniel, I finally found what I was looking for in reference to 'summer oysters'.

both the fall and summer oysters have large, well defined stems that are usually offset to one side of the cap and ALWAYS have gills running down the stem.



Summer oyster stems are smaller and can be short, but always present. Mushrooms that appear to be summer oysters but lack a stem are probably Crepidotus species and NOT oysters.



I realize these quotes are taken out of context...both in response to a correct ID on summer oysters where some were surprised at the length of the stem.  I'm not familiar with the Crepidotus species that has NO stem.  
...by 'smaller' in the second quote I took him to mean 'thin'.

the source is a discussion in Arkansas Wild Foraging and not the mushroom site I thought...same mushroom expert though. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1834125426696429/

I know that many avoid fb all together but I find the targeted ID discussions a great help.

This was interesting from this site https://www.mushroom-appreciation.com/oyster-mushroom.html#sthash.sf6zQoDn.dpbs  ...it's not one I'm familiar with but I thought the mention of stem growth was interesting...I'll start paying attention to where they are on the log now.

They may not have a stem. If they do it will often be stubby and off-center if the mushroom is growing on the side of a log. If it's growing on the top you will see a more well developed stem.



This has got me wanting to get out in the woods but we usually avoid summer hikes here because of the ticks and it's been so dry.....  Over the winter though we brought home at least a meals worth of oysters every time...good food!


and this:

Stem: Sometimes absent or rudimentary, but often present; 1–4 cm long and 0.5–1 cm thick; eccentric or lateral—or central; whitish; bald; basal mycelium white.


https://www.mushroomexpert.com/pleurotus_pulmonarius.html


 
pollinator
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They look like the white oysters that used to grow in our yard. Take a spore print by setting a mushroom gill-side down on dark paper overnight.  Oysters produce a pale silvery slope dust, sometimes with a slight lavender hue.
 
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