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Who sells "equisetum hyemale" seeds (a type of horsetail)?

 
Fred Walter
Posts: 43
Location: Near Beaver Valley, Ontario, Canada
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I'm interested in trying what I've read at http://alternativestodentists.com/horsetail

Who sells "equisetum hyemale" seeds (a type of horsetail)?

I've been searching through online seed company catalogs, and I've not found any place that sells seeds of this variety of horsetail.

I've found some places that sell "equisetum arvense", but alternativestodentists specifically says "equisetum hyemale".
 
Gordon Hogenson
Posts: 23
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It's not a seed-bearing plant, so give up looking for seeds. It makes spores, but these are short-lived and very tiny. Stokes Tropicals sells bareroot plants, although I have never ordered from them, so I don't know about the quality of the company.
 
Kat deZwart
Posts: 103
Location: Limburg, Netherlands, sandy loam
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Don't know that kind of Equisetum particularly, but around here E. arvensis is abundant. It can be grown from root-cuttings but is a moody plant: on my old grounds it grew like there was no tomorrow (great animal feed, good for tea, high mineralcontents) but around here I can't grow it if my life depended on it. As already said, the whole horsetailfamily is sporebearing so looking for seeds won't work :')
 
Fred Walter
Posts: 43
Location: Near Beaver Valley, Ontario, Canada
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Another name for this plant is "scouring rush". A web-search on this name gets a lot more hits. It's considered a noxious weed in my part of the world (Southwestern Ontario, Canada).

Hopefully I can find someone that has some that they want to get rid of, that they haven't tried using pesticides on...

It seems silly to mail order plants from another country when they are available here, as weeds, if I could just find the people that have them on their property.
 
Isaac Hill
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Posts: 356
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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Oikos has plants. http://oikostreecrops.com/store/product.asp?numRecordPosition=1&P_ID=821&strPageHistory=cat&strKeywords=&SearchFor=&PT_ID=152
 
Ollie Puddlemaker
Posts: 148
Location: Houston, Tesas
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Fred Walter wrote:I'm interested in trying what I've read at http://alternativestodentists.com/horsetail

Who sells "equisetum hyemale" seeds (a type of horsetail)?

I've been searching through online seed company catalogs, and I've not found any place that sells seeds of this variety of horsetail.

I've found some places that sell "equisetum arvense", but alternativestodentists specifically says "equisetum hyemale".


Hello, Fred...

I, too, saw Doug's video on 'Alternatives To Dentists' and I've made and use his herbal tooth powder, it does work and I'm thankful. It took
me quite a while to locate a Horsetail plant at a nursery, then I found them all over Houston, as landscaping. Using the Horsetail as a silica
source may not be the ideal situation, it takes quite a bit to make any amount at all for consumpton, even if it is renewable. I've since
switched over to just ingesting DE (diatomaceous earth) it has a double-duty effect and right now it's extremely available, so I've stocked
up several 50# bags for human, livestock and garden uses...
 
Bob Dobbs
Posts: 145
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I may have live plants down at the nursery, I can check just before christmastime. Never thought anything about using it in toothpaste!
 
Ollie Puddlemaker
Posts: 148
Location: Houston, Tesas
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Bob Dobbs wrote:I may have live plants down at the nursery, I can check just before christmastime. Never thought anything about using it in toothpaste!


No, the horsetail is for the silica source which the body uses to repair teeth, bones, hair, nails, etc. The tooth powder recipe is an herbal formula of various items as pine resin, red root, white sage and a coupla others, I'd have to look it up for all the speciic ingredients and percentages, but it really works on restoring dental health. Also, instead of using a toothbrush, use a willow or alder twig to rub any discolorations off your teeth. All this was as the American Indians did for personal care...
 
Tyler Ludens
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Never use an abrasive on your teeth, as you can easily wear off the enamel. Do not use scouring rush/horsetail on your teeth.

 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1064
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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along those lines, flouride also eats away at your enamel from my understanding, so commercial toothpastes foster dependency by destroying enamel and making teeth require constant brushing and purchase to stay white and "healthy"
 
D Taylor
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See if Richter's sells it mail order from Ontario. Otherwise I'd be happy to mail some in exchange for something of similar weight by mail. Feel free to message me...
 
Joy Oasis
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Fred Walter wrote:I'm interested in trying what I've read at http://alternativestodentists.com/horsetail

Who sells "equisetum hyemale" seeds (a type of horsetail)?

I've been searching through online seed company catalogs, and I've not found any place that sells seeds of this variety of horsetail.

I've found some places that sell "equisetum arvense", but alternativestodentists specifically says "equisetum hyemale".

Did you find it?
 
Scott Krabler
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I found it here!
horsetail powder
 
Joy Oasis
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Scott Krabler wrote:I found it here!
horsetail powder

that is great for people who have no space to grow them. Otherwise they grow rampant, so it is best just to buy a plant (local nurseries now carry it a lot as they are popular in modern landscapes, at least here in Los Angeles.
 
Roberto pokachinni
Posts: 677
Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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It's considered a noxious weed in my part of the world (Southwestern Ontario, Canada).


It seems silly to mail order plants from another country when they are available here, as weeds, if I could just find the people that have them on their property.


If this is the case for you, then I would suggest going to the bush and gettin' some!

There should be a wildish/feral area to do this at that wont draw attention. Just bring a shovel and a bag and dig up some rhizomes. They should transplant readily as bare roots, so you should be able to dig up a fair bit, and don't worry too much about hurting the patch; it will quickly regrow to rebuild it's grove structure. You could also bring in some sticks and leaves to mulch the holes you created in the patch, and thus began the repair of your damage a bit. When you bring them home, lay them in trenches in a dampish area, bury the trenches and give them a good watering.

In my garden they are hard to get rid of, so I would consider their persistent nature when choosing where to plant them. I worked with a guy on a large garden project who was obsessed with eradicating horsetail. He had moderate success. Be careful.
 
John Saltveit
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Since I have been looking for them and identified them, I have found several patches of them in my local area. Each patch was enormous. I pulled some of the plants and they came with some roots still on them when pulled out of the ground. I chopped off most of the stem but then planted them in my yard. Some died due to hot dry summer, but some have lived so I planted more. Let the plants dry a bit before chopping them up in the grinder because they wont' grind well until they start to dry up.
John S
PDX OR
 
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