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Making a pan pizza for great justice and BB.

 
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Don't have a ton of countertop space, or a rolling pin to flatten the dough properly. So, It'll be a Pan Pizza, letting me pile on more ingredients without making a huge mess.

Pictures of making Pizza

Originally I was using a wooden spoon to try and knead the dough, but once I dried it out a bit more I just went in with my hands. Only real problem I had was keeping the dough from tearing in the pan. You can develop the gluten more with time and kneading, but I'm not too sure on how to do that properly.
 
pollinator
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As you said, simple time and kneading will develop gluten, not much fancy about it. You will notice a lot of bread recipes have you let the dough rise, punch it down, rise again...that's what's going on. The "no-knead" recipes that leave the dough in the fridge all night just use more time rather than kneading. For me, one batch of dough makes three or four pizzas, and I can tell the dough gets better after staying in the fridge. At about a week, it becomes like sourdough. I typically add the salt last, giving the yeast a little time to get off to a good start. A wine bottle makes a good rolling pin.
 
Nicholas Molberg
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Jordan Holland wrote:As you said, simple time and kneading will develop gluten, not much fancy about it. You will notice a lot of bread recipes have you let the dough rise, punch it down, rise again...that's what's going on.



Thanks Jordan. It seems like gluten bonds develop on their own, and kneading just gets it all straightened out and properly manipulated. Not needed for pizza dough, but bread and pastry will thank you for it.

Right now I'm looking to get 20 BB's out of the way as fast as I can. Anything I need to do to get them recognized on the forums? I'd hope this can count towards the Make A Pizza one. I've just spent about 6 hours trying to carve a stick into a wooden spoon, and everything hurts.

Edit: Typo on I've.
 
Jordan Holland
pollinator
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You can try pressing the "report" button and say it is for a BB.
 
Don't play dumb with me! But you can try this tiny ad:
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https://permies.com/goodies/7/rmhplans
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