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What is Your Favorite British Cuisine?

 
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What is Your Favorite British Cuisine?

Well-known traditional British dishes include full breakfast, fish and chips, the Christmas dinner,[3] the Sunday roast, steak and kidney pie, shepherd's pie, and bangers and mash.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_cuisine



Source - Bangers and Mash  


British cuisine has many regional varieties within the broader categories of English, Scottish and Welsh cuisine and Northern Irish cuisine. Each has developed its own regional or local dishes, many of which are geographically indicated foods such as Cornish pasties, the Yorkshire pudding, Cumberland Sausage, Arbroath Smokie, and Welsh cakes.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_cuisine



Source - Welsh Pies      




Source - Cornish Miners' Pasties      




Source - Scotch Eggs      


What is your favorite British Food?

 
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That pasty recipe you linked is terrible! totally and utterly wrong. you would be strung up in the Cornwall for calling that a Cornish pasty. Cornish pasties contain Beef (skirt mainly) not mice  potato, swede, salt and pepper placed into pastry raw and then cooked. no herbs no carrot and most certainly no cream of mushroom soup "shudder"
The official rules on them are  (Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) )

   They have to be made in Cornwall.
   They can only contain beef, potato, Swede (rutabaga), onion, salt and pepper.  No other meat, no other vegetables, no other seasonings allowed.
   The ingredients must be raw when the pasties are assembled and then slowly baked to produce the traditional Cornish pasty flavor and texture.
   The edges of the pasties must be sealed by crimping them in traditional Cornish fashion.

I'm quite prepared to let the first slip and the last in acceptable to change as well, but the middle two are sacrosanct!
 
Anne Miller
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Skandi, so sweet of you to point that out. I labeled it the way the source named it.

What would you call that picture?

Would you post a picture of what it really would look like for me? Or all the ones I got wrong?

I have never been to England or the United Kingdom so how would I know? I have never even eaten any of those foods or seen them in person.

Hey, I am just trying to help Henry with his contest.

This post was not about the food it was about winning PIE, apples and prizes.
 
Skandi Rogers
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Anne Miller wrote:Skandi, so sweet of you to point that out. I labeled it the way the source named it.

What would you call that picture?

Would you post a picture of what it really would look like for me? Or all the ones I got wrong?

I have never been to England or the United Kingdom so how would I know? I have never even eaten any of those foods or seen them in person.

Hey, I am just trying to help Henry with his contest.

This post was not about the food it was about winning PIE, apples and prizes.



I can see it's not your recipe! The pasty also looks ok at first glance, it was the fact it had carrot in it that made me click the link and look at the recipe. I don't know of any British food that uses tinned soup (other than soup!) I think that's a very American thing to do.
See the pasty below looks nearly identical.


 
Anne Miller
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All apples and the PIE has been given!  Henry's contest is still going as far as I know.  I thought long and hard about how to pick the winner of the piece of PIE.  I thought about using the way we pick promotion winners, an apple poll, or asking members to pick their favorite.  In the end I decided to pick the TOPIC with the most replies.  So we have a winner! This topic was the winner of the piece of PIE:  https://permies.com/t/148274/Bicycle-riding-UK-Ireland

 
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Skandi Rogers wrote:That pasty recipe you linked is terrible! totally and utterly wrong. you would be strung up in the Cornwall for calling that a Cornish pasty. Cornish pasties contain Beef (skirt mainly) not mice  potato, swede, salt and pepper placed into pastry raw and then cooked. no herbs no carrot and most certainly no cream of mushroom soup "shudder"
The official rules on them are  (Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) )

   They have to be made in Cornwall.
   They can only contain beef, potato, Swede (rutabaga), onion, salt and pepper.  No other meat, no other vegetables, no other seasonings allowed.
   The ingredients must be raw when the pasties are assembled and then slowly baked to produce the traditional Cornish pasty flavor and texture.
   The edges of the pasties must be sealed by crimping them in traditional Cornish fashion.

I'm quite prepared to let the first slip and the last in acceptable to change as well, but the middle two are sacrosanct!



im happy to hear how its suposed to be madeim quite fond of what they sell as cornish pasties here in south africa much like what you describe but with carot instead of swede (we dont grow swedes here) but on a trip to the uk last year i was rushing and missed breakfast so grabed a "cornish" pastie at the train station in london, it was probably 50% filled with leeks now im fin with leeks in soup ect but it was altogether too much in my pastie and ended up having to throw half of it away so glad to hear that this is not the norm in the uk.
 
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