• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

Naked Indian/Texas Madrone/Arbutus Xalapensis

 
Posts: 82
Location: New Braunfels, TX, Zone 8b, multi-generational suburban household
34
homeschooling kids forest garden urban books homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We're looking at land that has a few Naked Indian trees on it, which being new to permaculture I knew nothing about. So after some research, I see it's a very useful plant with medicinal uses and delicious(?) berries to eat. There isn't too much online about this species since it pretty much only grows in the Texas hill country and mountains, but I did see people claim it is nearly impossible to propagate.

So I want to know, have any of y'all had any experience with this tree? How does it taste? Have you used it for medicinal purposes? For dye? Have you propagated your own?

Share some pictures if you have one!
 
master steward
Posts: 3949
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1159
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi, Rebecca

I have lived in the Hill Country since 2002, the only place I have seen them growing is in Big Bend National Park so I thought that was the only place Madrone trees grew.

Are they native to your area?

They are beautiful trees with their smooth bark.  I have never seen the berries.  I understand they are related to Manzanita that I have read a lot about.
 
Posts: 19
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Im in ca near yosemite and they grow all over here like crazy .as far as i know the berries were poisonous for people but coons.bear .and all other animals eat them its basically all they crap out .and it is pretty much a giant manzonita .burns so hot you cant put it in a fire place  cause it will warp the stove or brak the cast iron .its super prolific and grows fast and extremely hard \ dense .it makes awesome spoons and cooking utensils
 
Jesse Cooper
Posts: 19
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Im not sure if theyre the same madrone .ive never heard naked indian before but it definitely grabbed my attention haha
 
Posts: 3
Location: Bulverde, TX
trees composting toilet woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live 15 miles Southwest from you on the property that have two deep ravines and rocky soils - perfect place for Madrones. However, never seen them in a wild here.
gift
 
19 skiddable structures microdoc
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic