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Catalytic pellet stove?

 
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Hi there permies! A couple of questions, I’ve been doing some research into catalytic stoves, I’ve come across several diagrams (or cutaways if you will) of catalytic stoves and how the smoke is supposed to flow through them. Some of these diagrams show a separate air intake to be used by the catalytic combustion, while others don’t show any separate air for it at all. Does a catalytic combustor require it’s own air supply?

Also, I was wondering why you don’t see catalytic style pellet stoves? Many pellet stoves can already run up to a day on a single bag of pellets, so surely if a catalytic model were designed that time could be greatly improved. Is there a reason that I’m missing as to why this has not been done? Could it be that a pellet stove simply could not smolder long enough for this to work and would simply extinguish? Curious if anybody would happen to know more on the subject. Thanks!
 
pollinator
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Location: Denmark 57N
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Pellet stoves don't smolder at all, they always burn the fuel with full air and produce little to no smoke, the amount of heat being put out is controlled by how many pellets are being added. On a more cynical note I believe that in the US pellet stoves are exempt from requiring a converter and therefore they don't have them.
Our heating system here is a pellet boiler in the barn running to radiators in the house on a cold winter day it burns 3 bags of fuel but on a standard day it's around 1.5 bags. (20kg) When everything is up to temperature the furnace simply stops burning then when the water temp drops below a set value it fires up again, at no point does it go into a damped down state, it's stated efficiency is up to 93% so there's not much room for improvement.
 
pollinator
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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I don't know if this has been sorted yet, but since catalytic stove allow for the combustion of the fuel at lower than standard temperatures this results in the release of more dioxins into the environment i.e. the air you will be breathing.  At higher temperatures these dioxins are incinerated.
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