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Rooms in a wofati

 
Posts: 11
Location: Ruther Glen, Virginia
forest garden fungi homestead
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I can see in my research so far that the typical- or possibly only- wofati design has much open space and little to no separation between rooms. It's beautiful, airy and social, but I have certain requirements for where I'm going to live. In a nutshell,  I need a bedroom to which I can retreat in COMPLETE isolation with minimal noise transfer to or from the rest of the house, so I may cope with mental illness "wobbles" and re-ground myself. And thankfully, in such a wonderful house that in it's inherent design honors nature and the earth, it will be a much more simple task.

I am hiring a structural engineer to help me design what I need into my first wofati project, and help me get it past the code laws here in the Commonwealth of Virginia (no easy task). Can I get any guidance on putting clearly separated rooms into my design? I am a brilliant scientist, but physics was always more difficult for me; nevertheless, I am learning.

I need an entrance area, kitchen, dining area, living/social room, workroom and 3 bedrooms.
 
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Posts: 3923
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1149
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
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Marianna, You may have seen these threads.  Just in case you haven't they will be very helpful especially the one about Cooper Cabin. It has at least two bedrooms, if not three.

https://permies.com/t/33160/permaculture-projects/wofati-cooper-cabin

https://permies.com/t/26205/wofati-allerton-abbey-version
 
Marianna Johnson
Posts: 11
Location: Ruther Glen, Virginia
forest garden fungi homestead
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I'm all over it, thanks! I'll keep searching and reading.
 
Posts: 7
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I love earth homes and my special brain requires a fair amount of cave time but I need tons of light too. I saw a very cool plan that had a concrete bump out in the rear of the wofati that was open on top and filled with greenery (think egress window well on steroids). I love the idea and it’s an optional emergency exit where you wouldn’t expect it. I’m excited for your project and hope it’s all you need and desire. For fun you may want to check out survival shelter ideas on YouTube. The video is called build the most beautiful underground house villa by ancient skills. I watched one tiny young woman with bare feet and hands build a beautiful home with 2 hand tools and a clay pot. She was inspiring and it was one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen a person do.
 
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Posts: 32679
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
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I arrived on this property 7 years ago.   I was confident that a wofati could be build so quickly, that before the snow would arrive the first year, we would have four built.  The ATI of all four would pass, and then we could begin exploring further experiments.  

I very much like to get to the point that a wofati ends up being the cheapest, fastest and overall best home design for sloped, wooded land.  

And, I wish for everything to go much faster so I can get to the next round of design:   the ability to easily move the interior walls to facilitate changes in needs of the structure.  This would require that the floors are a consistent level and the ceiling is a consistent height.   A wall could be moved, locked in place and then a room is created.  Five years later, the wall is unlocked and moved three feet over.  I am imagining that the  "lock" function is something within the wall that makes it two inches taller - thus compressing into the ceiling.  


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But we are years away from that.  

My first thought, at this time, is slip straw walls.  Although I have very little experience with it - I am anxious to try!


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