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Wild Raspberry Management

 
Max Kennedy
Posts: 478
Location: Kirkland Lake, Ontario, Canada
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Have looked in the forums and not seen much on this. Can wild cane be managed and how? should it be on the 2 year rotation like the summer bearing or cut back each year. Is training to trellises a good idea? We have lots around the property but am thinking of those that grow at the edges of the lawn. Some patches are quite deep and the berries further back are not readily harvested. Not really worried about "leaving some" for the wild critters as there are many more patches in area's I don't intend to harvest, ie zone 5 patches. Thanks for any suggestions.
 
Nick Garbarino
Posts: 239
Location: west central Florida
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This doesn't really adress your question specifically, but I just want to throw it out there any way, for what it's worth. I once lived on a 4 acre property in Alabama that had a lot of wild blackberries, just off the edge of the lawn. I just let nature manage it. Some years we had lots of berries, other years not as much but every year we could count on getting some, and we did a grand total of zilch to manage it. I like easy.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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if you can have some equipment that will allow you to put a path through it..that might be helpful..depends on what is growing inside the bed, trees, etc..you could use a mower, dr trimmer, heavy duty string trimmer, hand pull? pruners..(hard work)..riding mower..
 
John Polk
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Trellising would be labor intensive at first, but would make future harvesting a lot easier, and more productive.
The time spent once to trellis would pay huge dividends in years to come.

Trellised vines could be easily managed, such as pruning, which should result in healthier plants (better ventilation and sunlight exposure), which should result in better production. The benefits to harvesting will quickly show that the initial time spent trellising was time well spent.
 
Max Kennedy
Posts: 478
Location: Kirkland Lake, Ontario, Canada
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OK, so as I'm seeing it 1) paths 2)trellis. Any pruning this year? wait to fall and prune the canes that bear fruit? this is the part I'm really not sure on. Thanks in advance.
 
Craig Dobbelyu
pollinator
Posts: 1239
Location: Maine (zone 5)
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forest garden hugelkultur
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I have a couple areas on the far corner of my 7 acres where the blackberries are just going crazy with growth. I just prune out the dead canes at the ground level early in the spring. It's a good task to undertake while wearing a heavy coat and thick gloves. Plus after a long winter, I just want to get outside so, jumping into a blackberry patch doesn't seem like a bad idea. I also cut out canes that will obstruct one another too much, or that limit my ability to move around to harvest. If the canes' tips are drooping too close to the ground I cut them to about hip level so that they don't hit the ground when heavy with fruit. you can allow the tips to touch the ground if you want them to root and extend the berry patch. You can also lay a cane over on the ground and bury it shallowly so that the whole length of it roots. New canes will sprout all along the buried cane.
 
Morgan Morrigan
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
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cut out the old canes now, and plant some trees on back side of patch. In couple years you can use rope between em to trellis.

are there still stem ends on the canes that fruited last year so you can ID em?

new trick is to cut to a line, and wrap a rope around the base/halfway of this years canes. Next spring you can hook up the rope to the bumper, and pull em vertical to trellis.

put rope around all new ones that come up this year, and all the ones that are trellised can be cut. then pull up this years , after cutting the old ones.
 
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