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Vermicomposting bedding for red wigglers

 
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Hi all,

I recently harvested my first batch of worm castings. I used 80% shredded cardboard, 15% newspaper/white paper and 5% finished compost because all of that comes at zero cost. The worms broke down everything as quickly as I could hope for.

My issue is with the castings. They’re made up of a ton of paper fibers, go figure. I make brewed compost tea with them and the paint strainer bag I use gets clogged up with that paper fiber. No big deal. But it makes me wonder, what is the nutrient value of paper to my plants and soil?

Is there a better alternative to using all this paper? Might fall leaves produce a better finished product?

Any insights would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 
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Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
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Welcome to Permies George.
Paper is about the least nutritious thing you can give them. The fact they ate them meant they must have been hungry. They like leaves, although those are a bit chewy still, they love all green waste of the kitchen.
The more you build up your compost mass the better. They can hide in it during drought and cold.
I invite you to read up , there is a whole section of relevant composting threads, waiting to be revived by all the questions you might have.
All the best
 
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My partner brought home a big bag of shredded paper. We heard red wigglers like it, but your posting understandably says it's not nutritious.  So i wonder if it should be worked in, given i already have leaves, straw, rabbit poo, other compost in varied stages. Wouldn't i just be polluting the compost pit i have in my greenhouse?  Thanks
 
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Some people reject paper because of the chemical residue of production.
Other than that,  paper is a natural as can be.
It's highly processed trees.
Like highly processed wheat, it lacks micro nutrients but it has readily available "calories".
Used cardboard,  napkins,  paper towels and brown paper bags all go into my compost,  but white paper is usually recycled.
 
Hugo Morvan
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Aha William, i had no idea paper has calories.
I just like to imitate nature and give my worms as much non processed foods as i can.
Colored paper i rarely give them, what chemicals they have used i cannot possibly know sure enough, the labels stuck to tea bags are the biggest part of colored pieces they will encounter.
I worry people will use these waste streams as the main food source for their worm projects.
I am pretty openminded about what to feed them. I hear people say, no fish/meat/citruspeel and all. All going into my cold vermicomposting pile and comes out fine.
Worms say hi!
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[Thumbnail for WORM-PARADISE.jpg]
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