• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Haasl
  • Pearl Sutton
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Carla Burke
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean

A Permie Post-Christmas

 
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
4 Cost-Saving, Eco-Friendly Post-Christmas Moves You Can Make Right Now - The below article is my subversive permie attempt to get my mainstream readers to rethink relying on 'recycling' to manage all the leftover waste. Back in the 70s, my mother used to shudder at my skinflint uncle, who would give each of my cousins a razor blade they could use to neatly slice through the tape on their wrapped gifts. They had to smooth out the paper and fold it up to be reused the next year. My siblings and I thought this was horrible, but now I kind of admire the ethos at work, both from a money- and resource-saving standpoint. Anyhow, here's my modern take.

Now that the gleam of Christmas has lost a bit of its glimmer, you might be looking at your living room full of spent wrapping paper and holiday cards cluttering the mantel and mentally planning when you're going to clean-sweep the whole thing and move on. Because if there was ever a year we wanted to move on from, it's this one, right?! But before you abandon the holidays, tossing everything into recycling and jumping feet-first into 2021, here are four cost-saving, eco-friendly moves you can still make as the whole kit and kaboodle winks out.

1. Keep Your Holiday Cards 2. Keep Your Bows and Strings 3. Compost Your Gift Wrap 4. Stock Up for Xmas 2021

Full post:

https://www.catintheflock.com/2020/12/3-eco-friendly-cost-saving-post-christmas-moves-you-can-make-right-now.html

Any other reuses for holiday cards? Other permie post-Christmas ideas?
Xmas-Cards.jpg
[Thumbnail for Xmas-Cards.jpg]
 
master pollinator
Posts: 145
Location: East of England
77
cat forest garden trees tiny house books writing
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nice, Lisa! My hubby is also one who carefully peels off the tape to reuse the paper - though he's never resorted to the razor blade idea, he'd be sure to think it a very sensible plan!

I'm wondering about the colored inks in commercial wrapping paper - is that likely to be an issue?  I'm thinking next year, I'll use plain brown paper for wrapping, maybe with a few natural ink stampings. Then we could recycle it as guinea pig bedding.
 
Lisa Brunette
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jane Mulberry wrote:Nice, Lisa! My hubby is also one who carefully peels off the tape to reuse the paper - though he's never resorted to the razor blade idea, he'd be sure to think it a very sensible plan!

I'm wondering about the colored inks in commercial wrapping paper - is that likely to be an issue?  I'm thinking next year, I'll use plain brown paper for wrapping, maybe with a few natural ink stampings. Then we could recycle it as guinea pig bedding.



Thank you, Jane! Ha ha on the razor blade idea. I've also in the past wrapped gifts in scarves, and the wrapping then becomes part of the gift.

On the ink issue = That's something we debated about as well, but in the end, we decided not to take such a purist stance. The compost will break down over a period of at least three months. It's the same argument people make about not using cardboard boxes for sheet mulching. Our environment is awash in toxics, so gatekeeping right where you can do a lot of good by diverting materials away from a not-really-recycling process or landfill doesn't seem to make sense, in the grand scheme of things.
 
Jane Mulberry
master pollinator
Posts: 145
Location: East of England
77
cat forest garden trees tiny house books writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Long composting can probably deal with most things.
 
gardener
Posts: 4329
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1603
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
1.

Jane Mulberry wrote:Long composting can probably deal with most things.

Fungal composting may cope with nasty stuff better than worms or bacteria, so keeping more questionable ingredients in a separate bin that can then be finished under mulch around trees is an approach I use. My big concern about cards is that "sparkly" stuff is probably micro plastics and I have *no* good solution for that problem right now. I know there are a few bugs out there that eat plastic, but I wish people would use the KISS principle and go for plain!
2. "What Christmas Paper?" We use cloth sacks, most of which are at least 20 years old - reused, reused, reused...
3. "Cards as gift tags" - we save our gift tags to re-use each year also. Within family and friends, we collect and distribute to the giver for re-use. Yes, we do occasionally get funny looks, but I figure it's "Permaculture 1.0" and at least for one friend, it led to her actually starting a small veggie garden. That's still a drop in the bucket, but the same friend actually made Oregon Grape Jelly this year, so we're at drop two! (Actually, I think she's at drop three now - her husband made her a new raised bed and she put punky wood at the bottom to hold moisture - I'm infecting her brain!)
4. Of course, principle one is to "reduce" - does your great Aunt *really* need a new plastic sweater for Christmas? I know we joke about socks for Christmas, but at least they wear out faster than sweaters do. Hubby raises meat chickens and we've encouraged some of our customers to give a frozen, locally raised chicken as a gift, or a dozen of our eggs. It's a matter of changing mind-sets. Mind you, a few home-baked cookies to go with wouldn't hurt.
 
Jane Mulberry
master pollinator
Posts: 145
Location: East of England
77
cat forest garden trees tiny house books writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We don't do the sparkly stuff! Yeah, I'm also thinking glitter is microplastics. Sadly, it's hard to control what others give us. One reuse option for the sparklies is that preschools, seniors day centers, and churches doing Messy Church may be able to use them to make new cards and keep those sparkles out of the landfiill an extra year.

Cloth reusable sacks are a fab idea!
 
master steward
Posts: 4890
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1504
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Previously, I would take the holiday cards I received and make new cards with construction paper. Then write a personal note inside the new card.

I also did a similar same thing with holiday cards to make gift tags.
 
Lisa Brunette
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jay Angler wrote:1.

Jane Mulberry wrote:Long composting can probably deal with most things.

Fungal composting may cope with nasty stuff better than worms or bacteria, so keeping more questionable ingredients in a separate bin that can then be finished under mulch around trees is an approach I use. My big concern about cards is that "sparkly" stuff is probably micro plastics and I have *no* good solution for that problem right now. I know there are a few bugs out there that eat plastic, but I wish people would use the KISS principle and go for plain!
2. "What Christmas Paper?" We use cloth sacks, most of which are at least 20 years old - reused, reused, reused...
3. "Cards as gift tags" - we save our gift tags to re-use each year also. Within family and friends, we collect and distribute to the giver for re-use. Yes, we do occasionally get funny looks, but I figure it's "Permaculture 1.0" and at least for one friend, it led to her actually starting a small veggie garden. That's still a drop in the bucket, but the same friend actually made Oregon Grape Jelly this year, so we're at drop two! (Actually, I think she's at drop three now - her husband made her a new raised bed and she put punky wood at the bottom to hold moisture - I'm infecting her brain!)
4. Of course, principle one is to "reduce" - does your great Aunt *really* need a new plastic sweater for Christmas? I know we joke about socks for Christmas, but at least they wear out faster than sweaters do. Hubby raises meat chickens and we've encouraged some of our customers to give a frozen, locally raised chicken as a gift, or a dozen of our eggs. It's a matter of changing mind-sets. Mind you, a few home-baked cookies to go with wouldn't hurt.



The Christmas cards don't go into the compost - for the reason you cited. At the blog link you'll see the wrapping paper is very low-ink, and made of rough, unbleached brown craft paper, too.
 
Lisa Brunette
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jane Mulberry wrote:We don't do the sparkly stuff! Yeah, I'm also thinking glitter is microplastics. Sadly, it's hard to control what others give us. One reuse option for the sparklies is that preschools, seniors day centers, and churches doing Messy Church may be able to use them to make new cards and keep those sparkles out of the landfiill an extra year.

Cloth reusable sacks are a fab idea!



This cloth wrap idea gave me another one: Holiday towels as wrapping and then an extra, festive gift.
 
pollinator
Posts: 498
Location: Chicago
143
dog forest garden fish foraging urban cooking food preservation bike
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I was young we had a large sturdy cardboard box with a lid, and my mom had bought some quality heavy wrapping paper one year and carefully covered the box and the lid with the paper so that the lid could be put on and off without spoiling the paper. Every year we anxiously waited to see who would get the present in the big box.  Must have used it 10 years at least.

 
pollinator
Posts: 342
Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
123
hugelkultur goat forest garden chicken fiber arts medical herbs
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I decided back in 1984, my first Xmas in my own place, to establish less wasteful Xmas traditions. At the time I was absolutely hard-line that all Xmas decorations had to be homemade and the tree had to be either a living potted tree to be planted in spring or an artificial tree I made myself. This was based on a very sad aluminum-foil tree I bought at an estate auction for 25 cents in 1984, stripped the peeling shiny aluminum fringe off, and replaced with fringed green felt I made from strips of felt bought at a fabric mill-end store. I painted the shiny silver trunk brown. Six foot tree for under $5. I still have that tree and the upper half of it gets set up some years, but in 2004 we started using a different tree as our main tree. My daughter had major back surgery that year and we spent 3 weeks in a children's hospital just before Xmas and bought her a ticket to a hospital fundraiser raffle which she won. The prize was a big stack of Xmas decorating stuff including an artificial tree. So since then every year we have used her tree and I had to relax my rule about all the decorations being homemade. It is now a mix of homemade and the stuff she won in 2004.

Most of our gifts go into cloth bags that I sewed out of recycled clothing pieces or cheap mill-ends in 1984 and have used every birthday and Xmas since then. These all live in a big cardboard box and are sorted by size from tiny drawstring bags to pillowcase size. Anything bigger than that gets wrapped in a sheet or towel.

Outside the family, special people I know will reuse them are sometimes given gifts wrapped in cloth bags, otherwise they get reused paper gift bags that I save from gifts that we have been given...I honestly can't remember when any of us were given a gift in single-use paper.

Any fancy paper gift bags coming in are saved and reused - I have bags that have been in use since the early 1990s. Same for ribbon. We don't generally bother with tissue paper unless there's some in decent shape saved from an incoming gift.  

I made permanent gift cards out of old Xmas cards years ago and these reside in big envelopes sorted by the giver/receiver names so they are easy to find/use. They are on loops of yarn with safety pins so no tape required.

We don't receive many paper cards - mostly email. Incoming cards are usually able to be reused to supplement the gift tag collection - for example to make blank tags for gifts to non family members who don't have a permanent tag.

On Xmas morning, everyone passes their gift bag and tag to me as they open their gift, I disassemble the tags and ribbon from the bag and it all goes back into the gift wrapping box for reuse. We have remarkably little garbage from Xmas, just whatever packaging a purchased item may have come with. And since a lot of gifts here are handmade even that is kept to a minimum.

What did I get for Xmas this year? Why thank you, I'm so glad you asked :)
- a fancy European steam juicer (an awesome score, brand new in box, but bought for half the price of a new one from someone who advertised it on the local internet ads and obviously couldn't find a use for it - we will use it lots! And have already steamed a rooster and red cabbage, yum - I know that's not juice, but a nice bonus use!)
- a natural goat care book by a member of permies
- the farmers almanac
- a calendar - goats in trees
- a coupon for help in the garden
- a coupon for welding lessons
- a homemade birdhouse
- homemade 'yart' = yard art, made from all repurposed stuff we had on site
 
Lisa Brunette
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Andrea Locke wrote:I decided back in 1984, my first Xmas in my own place, to establish less wasteful Xmas traditions. At the time I was absolutely hard-line that all Xmas decorations had to be homemade and the tree had to be either a living potted tree to be planted in spring or an artificial tree I made myself. This was based on a very sad aluminum-foil tree I bought at an estate auction for 25 cents in 1984, stripped the peeling shiny aluminum fringe off, and replaced with fringed green felt I made from strips of felt bought at a fabric mill-end store. I painted the shiny silver trunk brown. Six foot tree for under $5. I still have that tree and the upper half of it gets set up some years, but in 2004 we started using a different tree as our main tree. My daughter had major back surgery that year and we spent 3 weeks in a children's hospital just before Xmas and bought her a ticket to a hospital fundraiser raffle which she won. The prize was a big stack of Xmas decorating stuff including an artificial tree. So since then every year we have used her tree and I had to relax my rule about all the decorations being homemade. It is now a mix of homemade and the stuff she won in 2004.

Most of our gifts go into cloth bags that I sewed out of recycled clothing pieces or cheap mill-ends in 1984 and have used every birthday and Xmas since then. These all live in a big cardboard box and are sorted by size from tiny drawstring bags to pillowcase size. Anything bigger than that gets wrapped in a sheet or towel.

Outside the family, special people I know will reuse them are sometimes given gifts wrapped in cloth bags, otherwise they get reused paper gift bags that I save from gifts that we have been given...I honestly can't remember when any of us were given a gift in single-use paper.

Any fancy paper gift bags coming in are saved and reused - I have bags that have been in use since the early 1990s. Same for ribbon. We don't generally bother with tissue paper unless there's some in decent shape saved from an incoming gift.  

I made permanent gift cards out of old Xmas cards years ago and these reside in big envelopes sorted by the giver/receiver names so they are easy to find/use. They are on loops of yarn with safety pins so no tape required.

We don't receive many paper cards - mostly email. Incoming cards are usually able to be reused to supplement the gift tag collection - for example to make blank tags for gifts to non family members who don't have a permanent tag.

On Xmas morning, everyone passes their gift bag and tag to me as they open their gift, I disassemble the tags and ribbon from the bag and it all goes back into the gift wrapping box for reuse. We have remarkably little garbage from Xmas, just whatever packaging a purchased item may have come with. And since a lot of gifts here are handmade even that is kept to a minimum.

What did I get for Xmas this year? Why thank you, I'm so glad you asked :)
- a fancy European steam juicer (an awesome score, brand new in box, but bought for half the price of a new one from someone who advertised it on the local internet ads and obviously couldn't find a use for it - we will use it lots! And have already steamed a rooster and red cabbage, yum - I know that's not juice, but a nice bonus use!)
- a natural goat care book by a member of permies
- the farmers almanac
- a calendar - goats in trees
- a coupon for help in the garden
- a coupon for welding lessons
- a homemade birdhouse
- homemade 'yart' = yard art, made from all repurposed stuff we had on site



Andrea, my hats off to you. You are a permie queen!
 
Andrea Locke
pollinator
Posts: 342
Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
123
hugelkultur goat forest garden chicken fiber arts medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lisa, LOL. I think we're doing ok for Christmas perminess at our house, but I don't think I am even close to being the permiest for the holidays.

There are a lot of folks on this forum and elsewhere who celebrate a no-impact or positive-impact holiday. I'm especially thinking of those who take the opportunity to give back to society and/or the planet by cooking or serving dinners for people in need, donating to charities that provide livestock to people in the third world or support conservation/reforestation etc., or otherwise helping out. To my mind, that is probably the true spirit of "Permie Christmas" (for those who don't celebrate Christmas, substitute the holiday observance of your choice, I meant for this this sentiment to be inclusive).
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 4329
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1603
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Andrea Locke wrote:There are a lot of folks on this forum and elsewhere who celebrate a no-impact or positive-impact holiday. I'm especially thinking of those who take the opportunity to give back to society and/or the planet by cooking or serving dinners for people in need, donating to charities that provide livestock to people in the third world or support conservation/reforestation etc., or otherwise helping out.

Does giving a garbage can of fresh duck shit to my neighbor for Christmas qualify? He's retired and he and his wife have had major health issues. He looked very happy with it!

Saving the planet can start in your neighborhood with building soil and community.
 
Andrea Locke
pollinator
Posts: 342
Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
123
hugelkultur goat forest garden chicken fiber arts medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jay Angler wrote: Does giving a garbage can of fresh duck shit to my neighbor for Christmas qualify? He's retired and he and his wife have had major health issues. He looked very happy with it!



That's a brilliant gift! I would be very happy with it too

And I agree, lots of ways to save the planet and they all start with soil and community.
 
Posts: 6
Location: California, East Bay United States
2
forest garden books food preservation
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for these great ideas. Regarding gift wrap, our family switched to furoshiki gift wrap about 10 years ago. Now we have a pile of festive fabrics and cloth ribbons scrounged from yard sales and sewing friends' stash. It is fun to try fancy methods of folding the gift inside the cloth and tying nice bows. After the holidays, everything gets folded up and stored back in the boxes. We also have a few big old pillow cases that were painted back in the kids' scouting days (they are in their 30's now). Those have been under the tree for over 20 years now.
 
Posts: 26
5
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tried. One year I made beautiful cloth bags to wrap all the presents. I figured the bags could be used year after year. Right. My oldest grand daughters collected all the bags and stuffed the bags with their toys. They played Christmas all year long.
 
pollinator
Posts: 155
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada -- Zone 5a
71
cat trees books cooking bee writing
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was the kid who saved all the wrapping at Christmas, probably starting at 10 years old. Then my wonderful grandma made a pile of Christmas sacks out of festive quilting material. I have been the keeper of these, and do most of my "wrapping" in them... sure cuts down on wrapping work! Also, believe it or not, there was a time probably 30 years ago when festive reusable Christmas gift sacks were a freebie handed out at a local gas station if you got a fill up. So we have a few of those, too. Christmas morning clean up is pretty easy, and not much is thrown away.

We often receive gifts in paper gift bags. These are also stored from year to year to be used, and this is what I use if gifts are going to people outside the family/house. I also refold tissue paper to reuse in the paper gift bags. Any wrapping paper we get from others also gets refolded, and then often used to wrap the tiny things inside stockings. My mom loves using real, beautiful ribbon on gifts, so I always save that too. Gift tags might be anything from upcycled cards, to reused tags, to stickers, to handmade out of cardstock. (I loved that idea about "permanent" gift tags, too!)

Sometimes people will say to me (especially when my daughter was younger): "Don't you enjoy the wild ripping open of wrapping paper? Isn't it a bit sad to miss out on that part?" Um... nope. I actually don't like it. And my daughter never particularly cared either. The gift is the thing, not the wrapping. And anyway, under our tree looks just as festive and happy as under any tree! Colourful sacks, big ribbons... it's beautiful. Plus, c'mon, it's Christmas... doesn't a gift to our Earth seem like the right thing to do?
 
Posts: 24
Location: WNY
5
forest garden urban cooking
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I had a modest stack of holiday-themed napkins that I'd intended to sew up into gift bags someday. Managed to use a couple of the napkins for furoshiki-style wrapping, and secured them with holiday-themed pins (brooches) I was also getting rid of.  (Clearly a newbie w/the furoshiki skills.)

Thanks for the "ribbon and safety pin" gift tag securing method. Don't know why I hadn't already thought of that, I have and use both of these regularly. 🤔
 
Lisa Brunette
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It looks like cloth sacks or reusable fabric wrappings of another kind are a common theme here... Though at least one person cited getting these for free from a gas station back in the day, I wonder where else you're all sourcing these sacks. I'd love to see some images of these if you'd like to share, especially if you made them yourself!

Thanks, everyone, for the clever ideas and enthusiasm here. Really enjoying the list.
 
Posts: 108
Location: Indiana
19
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These posts reminded me of what we did with the Christmas cards when I was a kid - many, many years ago!
We strung a couple of cloths lines in out living room (old farm house) and hung each and every card on the lines for everyone to enjoy. Even friends dropping by would take the time to view all the cards - not to be nosy, but for the artwork and the printed messages.
It brightened up the house for about 4-6 weeks - especially during bleak winter weather and snow.
 
Posts: 86
Location: Upstate New York
33
chicken solar rocket stoves
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
People don't send holiday cards in the mail much anymore, but back when they did, I would save all the ones that didn't have writing on the inside cover. I would cut the cover off and send them the following year as postcards. Cheaper postage as well as free cards.

I also like to wrap gifts in fabric or scarves because I'm a textile junkie. I don't know why I never thought of making cloth gift bags to use from year to year!!

By way of lowering my holiday tree footprint, I looked for a branch whose end resembled the tree shape I wanted, then just pruned off the branch to use as a tiny tree. We have a pillar in our living room that helps hold up the top floor, so I fastened the "tree" to the pillar and decorated it with tiny ornaments. Bonus: it was too small for the cats to climb and too high for them to knock off the ornaments.
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 4329
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1603
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lisa Brunette wrote: I'd love to see some images of these if you'd like to share, especially if you made them yourself!

Santa-sacks.JPG
Small ones for stocking stuffers, big ones for gifts of different sizes and shapes, all homemade.
Small ones for stocking stuffers, big ones for gifts of different sizes and shapes, all homemade.
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 4890
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1504
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I received a pleasant surprise when I went to pick up the mail today.

There was a black square of heavy construction paper with Christmas tree ornaments and snowflakes painted on one side in white paint and on the back was a white circle that was glued to the back so a message could be written.

I thought that was so thoughtful and homemade!  Wish I could show a picture of how pretty it is.
 
Lisa Brunette
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
@Jay Angler--

Those are beautiful!
 
Posts: 411
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
90
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I sometimes make bunting from wrapping paper and garden twine.  I was thinking this year it would make a small gift to post to friends.  Like others on here I also make gift tags from the greetings cards.  I seem to be building up a stash - it would be nice to bundle them up and sell them for charity.
bunting.JPG
[Thumbnail for bunting.JPG]
 
Andrea Locke
pollinator
Posts: 342
Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
123
hugelkultur goat forest garden chicken fiber arts medical herbs
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hester, I like that bunting!

Here are a photos of a few of our clth bags and labels that get used every year, in some cases since the mid 1980s.  I made most of the bags and a few came with gifts from friends. Our older tags are repurposed cards but the more recent ones are cut from stiff scrapbooking paper.

You may notice the fabric is a mix of Xmas-themed and non-themed. This was an intentional decision so we have some less obviously Christmas-y bags that are appropriate to use for birthdays too. On the other hand no one in our house has ever turned down a birthday present just because it came in the wrong kind of bag!


IMG_2160.JPG
Bags
Bags
IMG_2164.JPG
Tags
Tags
 
Lisa Brunette
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Hester Winterbourne wrote:I sometimes make bunting from wrapping paper and garden twine.  I was thinking this year it would make a small gift to post to friends.  Like others on here I also make gift tags from the greetings cards.  I seem to be building up a stash - it would be nice to bundle them up and sell them for charity.



I love it, Hester! Have you ever thought about opening an Etsy store? If you do, let me know. I'm already thinking about a blog post for this year's holiday season...
 
Lisa Brunette
pioneer
Posts: 126
Location: Midwestern USA
17
monies fungi trees foraging food preservation medical herbs bee writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Andrea Locke wrote:Hester, I like that bunting!

Here are a photos of a few of our clth bags and labels that get used every year, in some cases since the mid 1980s.  I made most of the bags and a few came with gifts from friends. Our older tags are repurposed cards but the more recent ones are cut from stiff scrapbooking paper.

You may notice the fabric is a mix of Xmas-themed and non-themed. This was an intentional decision so we have some less obviously Christmas-y bags that are appropriate to use for birthdays too. On the other hand no one in our house has ever turned down a birthday present just because it came in the wrong kind of bag!




Andrea, those bags are divine! Thank you for sharing!
 
There is no "i" in denial. Tiny ad:
Solar Station Construction Plans - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/t/138039/Solar-Station-Construction-Plans
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic