Win a copy of The Edible Ecosystem Solution this week in the Forest Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Greg Martin
  • Leigh Tate

preserving tomatoes

 
Posts: 84
Location: pietermaritzburg, South Africa
22
forest garden chicken bee
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
just came across this article wonder what other fruits it would work for.
https://wire.farmradio.fm/farmer-stories/burundi-farmer-finds-new-technique-for-preserving-tomatoes/
 
pollinator
Posts: 830
Location: North Carolina zone 7
170
hugelkultur forest garden fungi foraging ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good article Brian. I grow a lot of tomatoes but am not a real fan myself. A few months ago I stuck slices in my dehydrator and my tomato world view changed. A fresh basil leaf in the middle and a touch of salt was all I needed. I feel like they would have kept quite awhile but they didn’t last that long.
 
Posts: 63
Location: Eilean a' Cheo
18
forest garden foraging trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As the woodash would be alkaline, I suspect that this is what is stopping mould (fungi) growth.  I've heard that sodium bicarbonate sprays can be used against mildew on grapevines for example (garden organic formerly HDRA mention potassium bicarb. Which is probably smilar pH.).  Assuming that nothing nasty was also burnt in the fire, the skin will presumably keep the majority of ash compouds out of the tomatoes.  Very interesting.
 
pollinator
Posts: 399
Location: Chicago
106
dog forest garden fish foraging urban cooking food preservation bike
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Amazing; I wonder why this was not discovered previously?
 
Posts: 78
Location: East of England
32
trees tiny house books writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wonder if what was burned to produce the ash would make a difference. Interesting to see if anyone can replicate it.
Nice article, gave me a smile to see how the farmer had improved his life. Thank you fpr posting it, Brian. :)
 
pollinator
Posts: 336
Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
68
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Interesting.  If someone in the Southern Hemisphere would give this a test (as you are picking tomatoes now), please let us know how it turns out in a few months!
 
Posts: 40
Location: North Island, New Zealand
42
chicken food preservation fiber arts woodworking homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mk Neal wrote:Amazing; I wonder why this was not discovered previously?



It was discovered previously! It was 'discovered' in the western world in the 1800's (or, likely, re-discovered--I suspect that this is an ancient preservation method). I remember reading a scientific paper from the 1700s or 1800s in 2015 where the author was comparing a dozen or more ways of preserving tomatoes for storage, and this method won out hands-down. Unfortunately, I can't find the original source, as all my search results are related to the above news story. I did find where this Nigerian work culminated in a recent scientific paper, however, with data on the results of the preservation technique -- the results look good! It can be found here. There's also a previous thread on permies about storing tomatoes in wood ash with some great info.

Phil Gardener wrote:Interesting.  If someone in the Southern Hemisphere would give this a test (as you are picking tomatoes now), please let us know how it turns out in a few months!



Kia ora from the southern hemisphere! I actually tried this ages ago--the 2015-2016 garden season--and they lasted a month before I ate them! I only had a handful of drying-type tomatoes at that point, so my trial was small--but the old scientific paper I found the method in excited me enough to give it a go even with small replication. My main crop is going to be coming on in the next couple weeks, so I will definitely try again and maybe take pictures this time!
gift
 
Companion Planting Guide by World Permaculture Association
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic