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What does 'No Manure Handling' mean?

 
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I'm relatively new to this site, my wife has been telling me to get on it for a while now but I just hadn't gotten around to it.  From my relatively brief search, I couldn't seem to find this answer in previous forum posts.

Looking at the animal raising PEP, I noticed the phrase 'No manure handling.'  When imagining my future homestead, I always thought that manure handling (which I had understood as shoveling into a compost pile) was just part of the deal, is this not the case? What are the permie solutions to manure that lead to no or less manure handling?  Or maybe I am completely misunderstanding the phrase?
 
pollinator
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If you leave animals penned in one area there will be a build up of manure. That manure can be both unhealthy for the animals, and the build up of nutrients can be unhealthy for the land if concentrated.

Industrial farmers rely on slurry pits and then using machinery to spread the manure on the fields.

In a permaculture system you would aim to avoid that problem in the first place, by avoiding concentrating manure in one place.

Eg cattle might be rotationally grazed with only a day or so on each piece of land. The manure gets evenly spread, and the cattle don’t end up standing in it.

Chickens might be “tractored” around the land, moved every day. They get fresh forage each day, and the manure is spread where it falls onto the grass.
 
Stella Ja
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Makes sense. Thanks!
 
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