• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

Growing Pecan trees in hugelbeds  RSS feed

 
Posts: 49
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Are pecan trees ok for hugelbeds, because a gigantic one just blew over up the road from my house, I want use some of the seeds to grow my own plus hugelize the tree.
 
pollinator
Posts: 10061
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
257
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Pecan wood is quite valuable so if you can sell it for lumber, you might give that a try. See if there are any small lumber mills in your area. Otherwise it is a high quality cooking wood, so should be cut and split for firewood. I would use pecan for hugelkultur only if I had so many fabulous valuable trees I could just throw them away.
 
Justin Koenig
Posts: 49
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you, I had no idea of its value, but I think a lot of it is rotten, but the firewood is definitely feasible.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1452
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
26
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most of what I have buried is pecan. I have 5 big old pecan trees and they are constantly dropping limbs in the yard. Since I have started doing the permie thing I am burying them instead of discarding or burning. Everything is growing great.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 10061
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
257
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If it's rotten it would make ideal hugelkultur, in my opinion.
 
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is great wood. Even branch wood is great firewood.

To get the seeds to start, pick up some that still have husks attached, but a little split, and put them in compost pile out of the light.
I could never get any to start till i put a load of leaves in the compost, and all the husked /split ones sprouted !
 
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sell the best wood of it's good

Keep the ok stuff for smoking meats

Put the rotten stuff under earth.
 
Justin Koenig
Posts: 49
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So does fresh fallen limbs and not so dead or rotten trees make for poorer huglekultur beds or does it just mean
a longer wait time for results?
 
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
299
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Justin Koenig wrote:So does fresh fallen limbs and not so dead or rotten trees make for poorer huglekultur beds or does it just mean
a longer wait time for results?



Fresh (green) and rotten (usually grey) woods have different properties. I believe that a good hugelbed should have both (as well as at different degrees of freshness/rot in between). A bed comprising of nothing but well rotted wood would quickly be converted into soils. It would shrink rapidly. A bed of all fresh material would have very little to offer the soils to begin with, but would continue to feed the soil for many years.

A green branch will shed water, while a dried out old log would absorb (and retain) rains like a sponge. I believe a good mixture would offer all of the advantages of both a new, and a mature bed.

If you grow annuals on the bed, at season's end, just chop them off at ground level. Don't pull them out by the roots (unless they are diseased). If their roots have worked their way down 2-3 feet into the bed, that is precisely where you want them to decay. It takes humans a lot of labor to get organic matter that deep into a soil, but Mother Nature makes child's play of it. Let her do what she does best.



 
Justin Koenig
Posts: 49
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you all for the responses they have been very helpful. Permies Rocks!!!
 
Skool. Stay in. Smartness. Tiny ad:
Solar ovens, haybox cooker - What would you build to go with a rocket oven?
https://permies.com/t/89917/Solar-ovens-haybox-cooker-build
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!