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brisket recipes  RSS feed

 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I had a bit of a look around on permies, but this cut doesn't seem to have been discussed.
'brisket' seems to be the standard name ...
Anyone else a brisket fan? How do you cook it? I've only braised it Asian-style, served with rice.
I know there's some traditional European recipes I should try
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Briskets are economical cuts, because they are tougher/chewier than the more expensive cuts of beef.

Because of this toughness, they are traditionally slow cooked, which renders them easier to chew. The Asian style works for fast cooking, because you are dealing with thin, small slices. In most Asian dishes, meats are cut into bite sized pieces prior to cooking. This is probably for economic reasons (you only need to buy one knife for the cook, rather than one for each person at the table).

To improve their toughness, they are commonly cured (corned beef/pastrami), which adds value for the processor, and improves their storage ability.

In parts of Texas, if you say the word "BBQ", most people assume you are talking about brisket. It is often given a quick char to seal in the juices. It is then put on a slower part of the BBQ to finish cooking. The retained juices steam while cooking, thus minimizing the chewieness, while the charring ehances the flavor.
 
Walter Jeffries
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Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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We love brisket, corned beef. Delicious and my personal favorite cut of the cow. Maybe tongue second then steaks and hamburger.

We boil ours and serve with peas, corn and potatoes. Traditional English food. All boiled!

I also make a pork version, since we raise pigs. See the recipe here:

http://SugarMtnFarm.com/cook/
 
Leila Rich
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I should've emphasised, I cook it for ages: I can't imagine it would be edible cooked fast, but I've never tried.
Corned eh. I love corned beef, but I've only had corned 'silverside'.
 
Tim Crowhurst
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Location: Bedford, England: zone 8/AHS 2
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Brisket is the ideal cut of beef for casseroles.

Usually I cut it up into chunks and slow-cook it with carrots, onions or shallots, beans (soak overnight, then boil for half an hour before adding to the pot) and ale, concentrated stock (or a stock cube) and loads of black pepper and thyme. I then add quartered portobello mushrooms about 30-45 minutes before the end of cooking. Freezes & reheats well, and is great as a pie with mashed or sliced potato or parsnip and strong cheddar cheese on top.
 
Cj Sloane
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It's a "lowly cut" but, quoting Arthur Schwartz,

Braised - in other words, pot-roasted - or any way you call it, moist-cooked brisket is the odds-on favorite celebration food in Jewish homes, the ne plus ultra of main courses.


I make several versions, all cooked low and slow, usually better the next day. I serve my Asian style one over rice noodles.

I do buy those pre-corned corned beef in the supermarket but only after Saint Patricks day at half price!

 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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My family used to corn loads of beef as we had no refrigeration.
I wouldn't have a clue what the cuts were, apart from 'enormous'.
When I get my (mythical?) chest freezer and my (mythical?) half a beef, I'll corn a bunch of brisket!
 
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