• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler

brisket recipes

 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
103
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I had a bit of a look around on permies, but this cut doesn't seem to have been discussed.
'brisket' seems to be the standard name ...
Anyone else a brisket fan? How do you cook it? I've only braised it Asian-style, served with rice.
I know there's some traditional European recipes I should try
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
323
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Briskets are economical cuts, because they are tougher/chewier than the more expensive cuts of beef.

Because of this toughness, they are traditionally slow cooked, which renders them easier to chew. The Asian style works for fast cooking, because you are dealing with thin, small slices. In most Asian dishes, meats are cut into bite sized pieces prior to cooking. This is probably for economic reasons (you only need to buy one knife for the cook, rather than one for each person at the table).

To improve their toughness, they are commonly cured (corned beef/pastrami), which adds value for the processor, and improves their storage ability.

In parts of Texas, if you say the word "BBQ", most people assume you are talking about brisket. It is often given a quick char to seal in the juices. It is then put on a slower part of the BBQ to finish cooking. The retained juices steam while cooking, thus minimizing the chewieness, while the charring ehances the flavor.
 
Posts: 1114
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
63
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We love brisket, corned beef. Delicious and my personal favorite cut of the cow. Maybe tongue second then steaks and hamburger.

We boil ours and serve with peas, corn and potatoes. Traditional English food. All boiled!

I also make a pork version, since we raise pigs. See the recipe here:

http://SugarMtnFarm.com/cook/
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
103
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I should've emphasised, I cook it for ages: I can't imagine it would be edible cooked fast, but I've never tried.
Corned eh. I love corned beef, but I've only had corned 'silverside'.
 
Posts: 45
Location: Bedford, England: zone 8/AHS 2
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Brisket is the ideal cut of beef for casseroles.

Usually I cut it up into chunks and slow-cook it with carrots, onions or shallots, beans (soak overnight, then boil for half an hour before adding to the pot) and ale, concentrated stock (or a stock cube) and loads of black pepper and thyme. I then add quartered portobello mushrooms about 30-45 minutes before the end of cooking. Freezes & reheats well, and is great as a pie with mashed or sliced potato or parsnip and strong cheddar cheese on top.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3738
Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
103
dog duck fungi trees books chicken bee solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's a "lowly cut" but, quoting Arthur Schwartz,

Braised - in other words, pot-roasted - or any way you call it, moist-cooked brisket is the odds-on favorite celebration food in Jewish homes, the ne plus ultra of main courses.



I make several versions, all cooked low and slow, usually better the next day. I serve my Asian style one over rice noodles.

I do buy those pre-corned corned beef in the supermarket but only after Saint Patricks day at half price!

 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
103
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My family used to corn loads of beef as we had no refrigeration.
I wouldn't have a clue what the cuts were, apart from 'enormous'.
When I get my (mythical?) chest freezer and my (mythical?) half a beef, I'll corn a bunch of brisket!
 
Posts: 5
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Brisket, when ground, makes the best hamburgers. It has a high fat content that gives it a rich flavor. In addition to corned beef, I have made home made pastrami and plain smoked brisket with a cardboard box smoker a`la Alton Brown. Easy and cheap, my two favorite things! If you want a more complicated but really different method, try German Sauerbraten. The brisket is brined for three or four days and then slow roatsed. served with gingersnap gravy, potato pancakes and red cabbage. If you make the traditional chocolate six layer kuchen for dessert please send me a piece!!
 
Posts: 146
20
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like the ideal that corned beef/meat brine will keep meat without freezing for forty days & nights.
No way a person could feed a family of 4 or 6 on a steer or moose without some of the meat soiling.

17th century
The British invented the term “corned beef” in the 17th century to describe the size of the salt crystals used to cure the meat, the size of corn kernels. After the Cattle Acts, salt was the main reason Ireland became the hub for corned beef.Mar 15, 2013
https://www.google.com/search?q=When+was+corned+beef+first+maded&oq=When+was+corned+beef+first+maded&aqs=chrome..69i57j33i10i160.23828j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aw47RIe3s3M
 
Posts: 5
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There is a little known cut (in the United Kingdom, at least) named Suadero, which is extensively used in Mexico and other Central/South American countries for tacos (amongst other dishes). Sitting between the brisket and the flank, my favoured local butcher used to just use it in his burger grind, but on request he will save it for me.

It is extremely "US BBQ Brisket" like in texture after a long slow cook submerged in fat (a confit, I guess, but generally on a much larger scale than you might do a couple of duck legs, and actually far more similar to the process used for carnitas - another Mexican taco classic).

If you have a friendly butcher nearby, or know someone who butchers their own meat, I'd absolutely recommend trying it. If there's interest, I can throw a recipe together.
 
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 2225
Location: mountains of Tennessee
906
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ahhh, yesterday was St. Patrick's Day. That explains why the grocery store had corned beef for sale. Tiny things vacuum sealed in plastic with gooey looking spices or something. Bzzzt, I think that's the wrong way bubbas. I think daylight savings time started a few days ago too. Sneaky.

To me (being from TX) brisket IS BBQ. All the other smoked & grilled meats are just something to munch on while the brisket is cooking. East of the Mississippi River pulled pork is mainly what is called BBQ. It's hard to find brisket in TN stores or restaurants. I truly enjoy a NY deli style corned beef sandwich or a nice pulled pork but in my opinion those aren't BBQ.

The big secret to cooking brisket is patience. It takes about 12-16 hours to BBQ one like a born & raised Texan. I start a day or two before by brining it in salty water. Then somewhere between midnight & 3 am on the day you want to eat start the fire & make some hot coals. Lots of them. I like using a combination of oak & mesquite wood. Careful with the mesquite if you're not accustomed to it. Very pungent stuff. Put the brisket(s) over the hot coals for a few minutes to sear it a bit. Sear both sides. Then remove about half the coals or raise the grill to use less heat. Then cook it directly over the coals for an hour or maybe two, fat side up. Once the coals die down & it seems partially cooked I start using a smoker process. Lots of smoke & indirect heat for the duration of the cooking process. Low & slow with fat side up is crucial for a tender result.

When it's done there will be some "bark", especially on the small end & any bumpy parts. Bark is basically charred meat. Some might call it burnt. Let it rest 15-20 minutes after removing from the smoker so the juices don't escape. Cut it across the grain. There should be a reddish layer (about 1/8") toward the outside, which indicates it was smoked long enough. The few restaurants who serve it here in TN seem to use meat slicers to cut it thin & then toss it under heat lamps. Please don't do that.

In TX it's traditionally served with potato salad, cole slaw, & beans or as a sandwich. There are many other tasty uses though. One of my favorites is chopped up on top of cheese enchiladas with a spicy TexMex enchilada sauce. Or in migas. Makes a darn good taco too!

This is an excellent & famous BBQ place that does FedEx deliveries. Their BBQ sauces are amazing too. Best lemonade I've ever tasted. https://saltlickbbq.com/

Stay calm & brisket on y'all!
 
Rob Anderson
Posts: 5
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Barkley wrote:Ahhh, yesterday was St. Patrick's Day. That explains why the grocery store had corned beef for sale. Tiny things vacuum sealed in plastic with gooey looking spices or something. Bzzzt, I think that's the wrong way bubbas. I think daylight savings time started a few days ago too. Sneaky.

To me (being from TX) brisket IS BBQ. All the other smoked & grilled meats are just something to munch on while the brisket is cooking. East of the Mississippi River pulled pork is mainly what is called BBQ. It's hard to find brisket in TN stores or restaurants. I truly enjoy a NY deli style corned beef sandwich or a nice pulled pork but in my opinion those aren't BBQ.

The big secret to cooking brisket is patience. It takes about 12-16 hours to BBQ one like a born & raised Texan. I start a day or two before by brining it in salty water. Then somewhere between midnight & 3 am on the day you want to eat start the fire & make some hot coals. Lots of them. I like using a combination of oak & mesquite wood. Careful with the mesquite if you're not accustomed to it. Very pungent stuff. Put the brisket(s) over the hot coals for a few minutes to sear it a bit. Sear both sides. Then remove about half the coals or raise the grill to use less heat. Then cook it directly over the coals for an hour or maybe two, fat side up. Once the coals die down & it seems partially cooked I start using a smoker process. Lots of smoke & indirect heat for the duration of the cooking process. Low & slow with fat side up is crucial to a tender result.

When it's done there will be some "bark", especially on the small end & any bumpy parts. Bark is basically charred meat. Some might call it burnt. Let it rest 15-20 minutes after removing from the smoker so the juices don't escape. Cut it across the grain. There should be a reddish layer (about 1/8") toward the outside, which indicates it was smoked long enough. The few restaurants who serve it here in TN seem to use meat slicers to cut it thin & then toss it under heat lamps. Please don't do that.

In TX it's traditionally served with potato salad, cole slaw, & beans or as a sandwich. There are many other tasty uses though. One of my favorites is chopped up on top of cheese enchiladas with a spicy TexMex enchilada sauce. Or in migas. Makes a darn good taco too!

This is an excellent & famous BBQ place that does FedEx deliveries. Their BBQ sauces are amazing too. Best lemonade I've ever tasted. https://saltlickbbq.com/

Stay calm & brisket on y'all!



Do you wrap? Paper or foil?
Staff note (Mike Barkley) :

Not no but hell no.

 
Posts: 1
Location: New Mexico
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Smoke'em!!  I'm from South Louisiana and it's a big favorite here. I like to inject mine with a little beef broth mixed with horse radish and heavily season the outside with  a cajun style seasoning the night before.  While it's smoking, i spray it with apple juice mixed with apple cider vinegar to help it stay moist.  When the internal temp of the flat gets top 160-165F I wrap it in foil with some kind of a sauce or thicker marinade and cook until the internal temp is 195-200F.  Take it out and wrap it in a thick towel and throw it in a cooler to rest for as long as your mouth can stand it, hopefully at least an hour.   I recommend starting to say things like "aw man, I done messed this one up" and "well y'all better order pizza cause this brisket ain't right" about half way through to try to scare off the hoards so you can st least try to get it cut before it's devoured!  Don't be intimidated, smoke something😜
 
pollinator
Posts: 220
Location: Sierra Nevada Foothills, Zone 8b
49
dog forest garden fish fungi trees hunting books food preservation building wood heat homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
HEy I had some brisket last night (corned beef)! Because my wife is named Erin Colleen it's pretty much a given that we eat that on March 17th every year.

But smoking it is the way to go. I go with an ancho chili based rub and smoke it for about 8 hours using mesquite chips. I know mesquite is not the usual wood used but I love it for chicken and I'm not serious enough to have two varieties of wood for my smoker. Nothing like brisket with some extra-spicy BBQ sauce.
 
master gardener
Posts: 2623
1014
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John and I are both of Celtic descent, with a strong tradition, at least the ones who came to the USA, of C,B&C. Yesterday, we had our traditional meal, with home-brewed beer & mead, and the company of good friends. This evening, we will have some of the leftovers, as fried cabbage, with corned beef, and we will do my chunky corned beef hash, and nibble slices of the meat, with Swiss cheese, pickles, and tomatoes - I may even track down some Ezekiel bread, so I can put mine on a sandwich. Normally, there aren't any leftovers, but normally we have a houseful for St Patrick's Day, and normally, John would have cured the meat himself, saving a big chunk to smoke for pastrami, too.

Every once in a while, we will get a craving for that meal, on a smaller scale, and we'll enjoy it another time or two, during the year - but, most of our brisket cooking and eating is just like Mike Barkley described. We adore the burnt ends, and there is nothing so stimulating to the salivary glands, as a beautiful, rich smoke ring...
 
master steward
Posts: 4842
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1491
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We just happen to have brisket for dinner last night.

I find having slices of brisket, just enough for a meal is a great way for a quick meal.  We slice the whole brisket then use the Food Saver to package it for the freezer. So easy to take a package out of the freezer every now and then.

There is a spice company in San Antonio, Texas called Bolnar'a Fiesta Brand Products.  I buy my spices from them online.  Dear hubby likes their Brisket Rub, Rib Rub, and Pinto Bean Seasoning better than any he has tried.
 
Posts: 6
Location: Twin Cities, MN
homeschooling urban homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Where I live in MN, brisket from properly raised cows can still be spendy! I was surprised. We use tongue for corned beef (OK so that was off topic
 
Posts: 12
Location: Oak Ridge, TX
dog books food preservation
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My favorite way for brisket is smoked. Since I lack skills in that area, when I make it I usually make Barbacoa in a slow cooker, then use it in burritos or tacos. I made about 40 pounds of it last fall for my daughter's backyard wedding at our place. I was able to make it ahead, freeze it, then heat in roasters on the day of the wedding.
 
Posts: 45
4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh gosh, someone needs to put together a cookbook  For us Permies just on brisket..woowhee...my mouth is watering
 
Dan Fish
pollinator
Posts: 220
Location: Sierra Nevada Foothills, Zone 8b
49
dog forest garden fish fungi trees hunting books food preservation building wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Pastrami is brisket?! Whaaaaaaaaaaa...... Upon a few seconds reflection, I am not that observant.

Also, thanks Anne for the spices tip!
 
Posts: 32
Location: moscow ID
6
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Leila Rich wrote:I had a bit of a look around on permies, but this cut doesn't seem to have been discussed.
'brisket' seems to be the standard name ...
Anyone else a brisket fan? How do you cook it? I've only braised it Asian-style, served with rice.
I know there's some traditional European recipes I should try



A few days late for saint patty’s day but here’s my corn beef brine recipe... clean brisket should sit in brine for at least a week (2 weeks better) at 35-40f. Easy and no nitrates. Much better than that store bought crud. After brine, just cover in water add more spices and boil for 3 hours so until it falls apart. Cook you potatoes, carrots and cabbage in same pot.

Cleaned up a 17lbs brisket last week; 2 flats went to corn beef brine; 2 flats going to a dry rub for pastrami; point is going into freezer for summer time long smoke fall apart brisket godness
4B5F3DA6-57F9-4B83-BE73-0134DD3233F8.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 4B5F3DA6-57F9-4B83-BE73-0134DD3233F8.jpeg]
22ADB27C-8C8E-4F8E-A988-1D4BF22A4559.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 22ADB27C-8C8E-4F8E-A988-1D4BF22A4559.jpeg]
90942D5C-F93C-486F-BE5C-8303E4AEFBCF.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 90942D5C-F93C-486F-BE5C-8303E4AEFBCF.jpeg]
 
Patrick Rahilly
Posts: 32
Location: moscow ID
6
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Corn beef brine recipe... add all ingredients, bring to brief boil to dissolve salt And sugar, let steep with lid on for an hour or so, let cool before adding to meat in a ziplock bag, seal with no air; turn daily. Cheers!
ABA788BB-6B5D-4F44-9ED4-3B3003F97221.jpeg
[Thumbnail for ABA788BB-6B5D-4F44-9ED4-3B3003F97221.jpeg]
A4FDC3CD-4F31-4FB6-BEDF-414B39154337.jpeg
[Thumbnail for A4FDC3CD-4F31-4FB6-BEDF-414B39154337.jpeg]
 
Carla Burke
master gardener
Posts: 2623
1014
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Dan Fish wrote:Pastrami is brisket?! Whaaaaaaaaaaa...... Upon a few seconds reflection, I am not that observant.

Also, thanks Anne for the spices tip!



Yup. Brisket, cured to corned beef, then smoked, becomes pastrami. That's why it's so expensive.
 
Posts: 67
Location: 5,000' 35.24N zone 7b Albuquerque, NM
39
hugelkultur forest garden building rocket stoves woodworking greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Horno (Earth Oven) Brisket, Tortillas, & Pinto Beans

24 hours before you eat, rub salt a brisket and place it in the fridge (keep elevated on a rack).  Soak your pinto beans in salt water. Make sourdough for tortillas.  

After 12 hours, light a fire with in your horno or earth oven. Let the fire burn for an hour then bank the wood in the back, quick brush and mop the brick. Let the fire burn down some then toss tortillas on the hot firebrick. Bake until they speckle then flip to finish. Let cool in a towel then pack in an airtight container for later.  Keep the hot coals banked in the oven.

Melt some bacon fat on the bottom of a roaster (place the fat in the roaster then slip it in the oven for a few minutes. Put your salted brisket in the hot roaster bottom to sear the meat. Flip. Scatter the browned top with about 3 c total of chopped onion, garlic, tomatoes and roasted/peeled New Mexico green chile. Pour a bottle of ale, cider or stock over the top. Cover the roaster.

Refresh the water for your beans (no salt). Place them in a covered cast iron pot.

Put the roaster and the and the bean pot in the horno with hot banked embers. Close the oven door and do not open for 10 hours. After 10 hours, reduce juices in the roaster on your stove top while shredding meat with two forks. Serve shredded brisket with warmed tortillas, salsa or cactus relish, and crema, with beans on the side.

Smokey, tender, crazy delicious.
 
Gay Hullar
Posts: 12
Location: Oak Ridge, TX
dog books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Barkley wrote:Ahhh, yesterday was St. Patrick's Day. That explains why the grocery store had corned beef for sale. Tiny things vacuum sealed in plastic with gooey looking spices or something. Bzzzt, I think that's the wrong way bubbas. I think daylight savings time started a few days ago too. Sneaky.

To me (being from TX) brisket IS BBQ. All the other smoked & grilled meats are just something to munch on while the brisket is cooking. East of the Mississippi River pulled pork is mainly what is called BBQ. It's hard to find brisket in TN stores or restaurants. I truly enjoy a NY deli style corned beef sandwich or a nice pulled pork but in my opinion those aren't BBQ.

The big secret to cooking brisket is patience. It takes about 12-16 hours to BBQ one like a born & raised Texan. I start a day or two before by brining it in salty water. Then somewhere between midnight & 3 am on the day you want to eat start the fire & make some hot coals. Lots of them. I like using a combination of oak & mesquite wood. Careful with the mesquite if you're not accustomed to it. Very pungent stuff. Put the brisket(s) over the hot coals for a few minutes to sear it a bit. Sear both sides. Then remove about half the coals or raise the grill to use less heat. Then cook it directly over the coals for an hour or maybe two, fat side up. Once the coals die down & it seems partially cooked I start using a smoker process. Lots of smoke & indirect heat for the duration of the cooking process. Low & slow with fat side up is crucial for a tender result.

When it's done there will be some "bark", especially on the small end & any bumpy parts. Bark is basically charred meat. Some might call it burnt. Let it rest 15-20 minutes after removing from the smoker so the juices don't escape. Cut it across the grain. There should be a reddish layer (about 1/8") toward the outside, which indicates it was smoked long enough. The few restaurants who serve it here in TN seem to use meat slicers to cut it thin & then toss it under heat lamps. Please don't do that.

In TX it's traditionally served with potato salad, cole slaw, & beans or as a sandwich. There are many other tasty uses though. One of my favorites is chopped up on top of cheese enchiladas with a spicy TexMex enchilada sauce. Or in migas. Makes a darn good taco too!

This is an excellent & famous BBQ place that does FedEx deliveries. Their BBQ sauces are amazing too. Best lemonade I've ever tasted. https://saltlickbbq.com/

Stay calm & brisket on y'all!



Mike, do you do your briskets whole or separate the point from the flat?
 
Mike Barkley
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 2225
Location: mountains of Tennessee
906
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I cook them whole.
 
pollinator
Posts: 191
Location: Melbourne, Australia
112
2
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books cooking food preservation writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I smoke my brisket too, a bit differently than mike but then everyone has their own style. I have always preferred straight hickory smoke on mine, but I would say mesquite is likely second for me. To prepare mine, I often do a simple spice rub of barely cracked peppercorns, sea salt, thyme, garlic, and just enough homemade mustard to make it all stick really really well. I bring the meat to room temp while this sits on the whole trimmed brisket and slow smoke it. My favourite part is what many refer to as the "burnt ends" and I absolutely love mine in a big baked potato, with brisket slices or cubes, and lots of cheddar cheese melted on top with a bit of plain greek yogurt (or sour cream) and chives.

My smoker is in the states, but this was something I would prepare when the close family was all getting together and all of us adored it. We would spend the whole day playing board/card games like munchkin & red dragon inn while keeping an eye on the smoker. It is something I miss dearly, thank you for reminding me! Brisket is a truly amazing cut and one that is often under appreciated. You guys rock!
 
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Barkley wrote:I cook them whole.


Same here :-) Although I don't care much for any meats (but do cook it), my "boys" like it and my "worse half" cooks it in a slow cooker with savoy cabbage, potatoes and onions . He buys it from our local butcher and ...I liked it too because it wasn't salty at all and so ever tender!? Our dog liked the broth with his kibble.
 
Mike Barkley
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 2225
Location: mountains of Tennessee
906
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, there are many ways to cook brisket. I've eaten &/or used most if not all of the methods listed above. Especially the various rubs & the cajun injection way. Can't think of any that were bad except those that were tough because they were cooked too fast or dried out from being cut thin & abandoned under a heat lamp.

I've been drooling for some brisket all week. Can't imagine why.
 
pollinator
Posts: 207
Location: 10 miles NW of Helena Montana
80
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Julie Granzin wrote:Smoke'em!!  I'm from South Louisiana and it's a big favorite here. I like to inject mine with a little beef broth mixed with horse radish and heavily season the outside with  a cajun style seasoning the night before.  While it's smoking, i spray it with apple juice mixed with apple cider vinegar to help it stay moist.  When the internal temp of the flat gets top 160-165F I wrap it in foil with some kind of a sauce or thicker marinade and cook until the internal temp is 195-200F.  Take it out and wrap it in a thick towel and throw it in a cooler to rest for as long as your mouth can stand it, hopefully at least an hour.   I recommend starting to say things like "aw man, I done messed this one up" and "well y'all better order pizza cause this brisket ain't right" about half way through to try to scare off the hoards so you can st least try to get it cut before it's devoured!  Don't be intimidated, smoke something😜



I do almost the same thing.  
I usually throw it on the bbq to give it a bit of "char" on the outside.  This seems to help keep the juices in.
When I cover in foil, I baste with a dark beer, several times.  
I smoke it for around 18 hours total.  

Mmmm... I think I have a brisket in the freezer.  Time to go look!!
 
I guess I've been abducted by space aliens. So unprofessional. They tried to probe me with this tiny ad:
Saturday April 24th, 2021: Full Tour of Wheaton Labs!
https://permies.com/t/158985/permaculture-projects/Saturday-April-Full-Tour-Wheaton
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic