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Anyone Use the Last(product)s?

 
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I just found this website. Use it? Work? Yes/no? https://lastobject.com/collections/all

Qtips to clean ears are a biggie here. No makeup. We also use Qtips about 3x a year to clean stuff. So, I could eliminate buying and storing those altogether. A good thing.

Use these? New to you? Seems like a product you don't or wouldn't need?

TIA!!!
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pollinator
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I can see the use of the cotton buds, but we would still need "normal" ones as they cannot be used with solvents such as acetone or non acetone nail varnish remover, oddly it says you can clean with rubbing alcohol I am not sure how those two facts go together I can't see any use (personally) for the rest, I mean the tissue is just a hanky in an impossible to clean case. I am rather concerned about the produced in Denmark and China bit, I fear they have a tiny artisan place somewhere in Denmark but what you will in reality be buying is nasty Chinese plastic, which reading more is exactly what you get since they posted on the 2nd of December that they will begin manufacturing in Denmark. I seriously doubt they have managed to get anything sorted about that yet.

They also have a terrible trustpilot rating of 2.6 most of the reviews say that the product is useless and breaks fast, or simply didn't turn up.
 
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I didn't go to your link so I am assuming it is about using Q-tips?

I buy them for my dear hubby as I don't use them. He using them to clean all sort of electronic gadgets that I never see him clean.  I just know the Q-tips disappear and we buy more.

From your title, I was going to explain how I use up the last bits of food in bottles. One of the handiest things I bought years ago was something you put on the top of a bottle so you can set another bottle on top of that one to drain into the bottom bottle. It is absolutely zero wate.
 
pollinator
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The "cotton" rounds might appeal to my partner, and I'll ask what she thinks... We've gotten quite accustomed to a delicates bag with our cloth masks in the laundry, it seems like a reasonable thing.

I don't think that I would use the swabs mainly since the negative reviews about comfort resonate with me, and I like the absorbency of the cotton swabs.
I'm also imagining the "best case scenario" for this company/product... being that total adoption of it worldwide = 7 billion "forever" swabs! I know that's extreme and unlikely, but I'm not so sure even one billion of these doohickeys at their end of life, is any better than all the single-use swabs made from cotton and paper. Their end of life to me seems imminent, and eminently better, just burn or compost them.
There's other uses of the cotton swabs that this "cleanable" version doesn't seem as appealing for, or suited to at all... such as applying medicinal ointments and not transferring the ointment or the problem somewhere else, or all the cleaning tasks... which can include unwinding some cotton to adjust the size or using the paper stick as a tool...

Cotton swab production could be "greened up" maybe by not making the plastic stick version of the swab (although plastic might have a medical or industrial benefit) not using bleached papers for the sticks, or using bamboo sticks and fibers, or the sourcing of the cotton, and definitely by eliminating all plastic from the packaging.

This last one, eliminating the use of plastics in packaging seems to be more pressing of an issue, and is both the "lower hanging fruit" and "the tougher nut to crack" since there's SO much driving it. Desire for customers to "see" a product (often in a clear plastic package), merchandising small packaged items on hooks in the store (rather than in bins, or on shelves, or loose and unpackaged), portioning versus bulk purchasing, no accommodation for using one's own reusables for packaging (both infrastructure and regulation), the shift towards untrained store clerks that scan barcodes...



 
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I think I have seen these advertised in Facebook or similar.

I personally wouldn't buy.
I use the non-plastic Q-tips for years now, but need very few during the year (the plastic version will be banned completely by mid of this year).

For cosmetics I use homemade swabs I have sewn from old t-shirts and towels and which I gather in a small net which goes to the washer once a week. This definitely reduced the amount of bathroom waste.

I also use cloth napkins but for tissues I am not sure. I only ever use them if I have a really really running nose and really iffy things come out of my nose. I would not want to wash such tissues with my normal washing or throw them in the washer for just a small amount of cloth tissues.
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