• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Devaka Cooray
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Leigh Tate
  • Steve Thorn
  • Jay Angler

How do you use the Rind off a Baked Ham?

 
master steward
Posts: 4559
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1395
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We are having a winter storm today so I am baking a ham.  In a few minutes, I will be trimming the extra fat and the rine off of the ham.

Just curious what do you use the rind for?
 
gardener
Posts: 3322
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
958
forest garden trees woodworking
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It goes in the pressure cooker with the bone from the ham and any other trimmings, as well as whatever jellied/caramelized juices comes out of the ham into the pan that you bake it in.  Plus a bit of onion and garlic.  I am a fan of very long cook times when making bone broth, even in a pressure cooker.  At least two hours, and more is better.

Every bone-in ham we've cooked so far has yielded enough scrap to make at least 4 quarts of good rich bone broth.
 
pollinator
Posts: 904
Location: Southern Oregon
247
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would use it in soup, just like parmesan rind. Or a broth like Dan suggests. I use ham broth for braised greens a lot.
 
pollinator
Posts: 350
Location: Virginia
129
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I dice up the big chunks of fat and the rind and render it for cooking.  The leftover cracklings are salted and inhaled.

The goo in the pan is saved for cooking beans and greens.  I like to freeze it and break of chunks as needed to add for cooking.

The ham bone and small fat scraps are added to the crockpot with a diced onion and a 2 pound bag of pinto beans and cook away for about 18 to 24 hours depending on bean texture.  It smells wonderful when I have to get up in the middle of the night! We eat a few meals over rice or cornbread. Part gets packaged for freezer.  It smashes up and makes great refrained beans too.  

We get a lot of meals and use out of the ham for two people.  I cooked one last weekend. So far we've had sliced ham for dinner and with eggs for breakfast, ham with beans and greens, in a soup, scalloped potatoes, evening snack of cracklings, couple meals of pintos and I still have a good sized chunk left!  Not bad for a 8+ pound spiral sliced ham I got for 5.22 on sale...🐷👍
 
master pollinator
Posts: 1092
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
277
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Excellent suggestions above. I dice the fat pretty fine and soak it to hopefully remove some of the salt. Then it goes out to the suet feeder for the wee birds, in small amounts. I'm still worried about the salt content, but when temps drop down below -20C they are all over it. Especially woodpeckers.
 
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 2120
Location: mountains of Tennessee
846
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tend to use it for cooking beans & for chicken food.
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 4559
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1395
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, everyone for all the great suggestions.
.
I use the rind for seasoning then I pick it out if it's too hard to chew.

I am trying to eliminate anything going into the trash.
 
bacon. tiny ad:
Rocket Mass Heater Plans - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/7/rmhplans
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic