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As promised...hello

 
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I’d like to start off by thanking everyone who post on here for others to gain knowledge. I’ve picked up several new tricks and techniques to apply to my fairly newly acquired 17acres

Secondly this might be a bit long winded so...

A bit about myself. I’ve grown up around plants my whole life. My dad owned a garden center / landscaping business all while I was growing up. I got all my basics from him. I didn’t get specific terms for some things or why they were good, just chop those leaves up and pile it up and water them etc lol.

So most of my life we used I’d say 75% organic style but he and in turn myself used chem fertilizer and such. Good results so I never questioned it until recently and now i would like to make my farm natural. We used a lot of the styles and techniques I read about here but still always used that chem crutch.

Fast forward 15-20 years dad is gone and I got my new place and want to do things different. I’m composting, leaf mold, mulching, hugeling, and who knows what next. This isn’t new just taking it to the next step to let nature get to the point I can really see the benefit of these things.

About a year ago I bought 17acres and have been frantically working to improve it. The dirt is horrible lol. I cleared a ton of cedar trees and started pasture. Dug an approximately 2acre pond for fish and livestock. Borrowed neighbor pto chipper and made a lot of mulch. Built raised beds for garden. Got 4 small heifers to start breeding stock. Fence was either non existent or trashed, so built new fence. And now we will see what tomorrow brings. 😁

Again, thanks to all who have posted and kicked my butt in gear and I hope I can return the favor for someone else in the future

Joe

 
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Posts: 560
Location: Southern Germany
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Welcome to Permies, Joe!
You might want to add your location - we have users from all over the world, which makes it even more fun and interesting!
When you have some time you can look into your user profile and add information there ("Edit user profile").

Happy posting!
 
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Posts: 1582
Location: Southeastern U.S. - Zone 7b
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Joe, welcome to Permies! I didn't find your introduction long-winded at all; just very interesting. I think most of us here are interested in the journey of others, because it's something we can all relate to. I love the direction you're heading and hope to hear more from you in our various forums.
 
Joe Hallmark
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Location: Central Texas
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I’m in central Texas. I had to pretend to be a plumber last two days. The freezing weather busted pipes all around here. No parts in 1/2 or 3/4 in the whole town can be bought now lol
 
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Welcome Joe!

Sorry to hear about your storm misery.  The same storm that got you got me but I am a bit to your northeast—as in Southern Illinois kinda northeast.  It certainly made for some cold weather didn’t it.

I am certainly glad that you could find good, productive use from Permies.  From the sounds of your 17 acres you have your work cut out for you, but you seem like you are off to a good start.  BTW, I wholeheartedly applaud the idea of a raised wood chip garden as that is sorts my M.O.  Have you considered inoculating with fungi/mushrooms?

Again, welcome to Permies,

Eric
 
Joe Hallmark
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I’m glad you replied. I have read a ton of your post! I have a small pile of wood chips going right now.

They colonized on their own so no clue what species of mushroom but the pile has shrank about half in around 6months.

Tomorrow I’m getting several trailer loads of chips from the city and plan to spread across the garden area I can’t use this year plus tip off the hugel and 3 raised beds I currently have.

I know you can’t resist a chance to recommend wood chips haha so thanks again for the reply
 
Eric Hanson
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You’re right, Joe.  I can’t resist!  I am just glad I found a receptive audience.

Sounds like you are well on your way to your own mountain of chips.  Any idea if recent events make more chips even easier to acquire?  

Just a thought,

Eric
 
Joe Hallmark
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Well I drove by today and will take the trailer down tomorrow. There is ALOT of chips there. Multiple trailer loads. I intend to help myself to all of them. It’s first come first serve so I’ll def get them all.

We didn’t get a lot of ice this time so no new broken limbs but 3-4weeks ago a ton broke.

I chip all my limbs up already with neighbors pto chipper. Huge pile of limbs don’t go far when chipped up. My pile after was depressing lol. But I blocked and split the bigger part of the limbs so it’s understandable

This spring I’d def like to get some wine cap spawn. If I’m guessing I’d say my current pile is colonized by some kind of puff ball type mushroom. I’ve seen a few in my new garden area so I’m only guessing
 
Eric Hanson
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Location: Southern Illinois
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Joe, as you probably already know, I chip my own wood from my own land.  And I definitely understand how an apparently large volume of brush and debris turns into a depressingly small amount of chips.  This is worst when dealing with small, twiggy type of brush.  Honestly, I almost hesitate to chip up the twiggy stuff because it requires about the same exertion on my part as a 12” diameter, 20’ long log.  And that log really delivers chips whereas the twiggy stuff yields up almost nothing.

But good that you have regular access to a chipper and plenty of feedstock for your chipping endeavors.  I think you will be happy once you get Wine Caps established and growing.

Eric
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