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What to do about 'unwanted' trees?

 
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I've been thinking I'd put them in the relocation program because I don't want to kill them. By "relocation program" I mean try to transplant them somewhere else (out in the boonies) to (hopefully) live.

I have no idea what kind of tree they are. There is a ~50-foot tall one in the rear neighbor's yard and several 5-foot tall ones in my backyard. I wonder if it's native to the area.

Another option would be to pull them out and let them decay into the soil.

Any thoughts?

Should I post pictures here and/or somewhere else to get the tree identified?
 
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forest garden trees urban
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Definitely post photos.
People here are rather good at identifying plants.
Once you know what it is, you will have a better idea of what you want to do.
Lots of trees would be prized at 5 feet tall with root ball
Moving them to the boonies to  grow would be low on my list, unless they are endangered.
Even then, you could probably sell them for coin with a better chance of them being well cared for.

I let trees grow unless they are explicitly in the way.
Sometimes that means cutting them back to the ground,  sometimes just to head height.



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I agree about identifying the trees before you get rid of them.  If you have lived there long enough to know they do not bloom then by identifying you can find out if they are beneficial, like adding nitrogen.

If you are going to get pictures, get pictures of close up on leaves and bark.

Trying to transplant into the wild is a lot of work for a tree that might die from lack of water.
 
Kurtis Gardner
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I got this error message when I tried to post four pictures, then only one 1.2 MB picture.

This site can’t be reached

The webpage at https://permies.com/forums/jforum might be temporarily down or it may have moved permanently to a new web address.

ERR_HTTP2_PING_FAILED
 
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Location: Franklinton, NC
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I would cut 'em down. The other posters are right; a grown tree will be very sickly trying to regrow its feeder roots if you try to move it someplace else. If you heated with wood, that would be a solution. If you feel badly taking out biomass, make the root holes your new composting sites. Amazing everything thrown away which properly belongs to the soil. The trees themselves you could keep (if you have the room) and make spoons, make soil, make mulch, whatever you want!
 
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Depending on the tree, and your area, you could consider digging them up and potting them in old flower pots you get when you buy plants at the store.  Baby them for a year and sell them next spring.  Trees are expensive to buy so you could possibly sell them for $10 or $20 each and make some good cash.
Some trees always send out suckers, Many people constantly cut back the suckers or dig them up and move them to another part of the yard without any problems.  Some of them could be from seeds sprouting, it is that time of year.
I think there is a website where you can post a picture of a leave and the website computer will try to identify it.  I saw someone mention it a couple weeks ago, but I do not recall the website.
EDIT:  It may be an app that can identify.
 
William Bronson
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A little off topic, but I concluded years ago that the easiest way to profit from a black walnut tree was to sell black walnut seedings, because the nuts themselves took too much processing.
Turns out I was wrong, because black walnut syrup is tasty and sells for quite a bit, plus it can be pulled from trees too young to produce nuts!

A bit more on topic, I have a nice tree that I actually kidnapped from a semi wild place.
I had no idea what it was when I grabbed it, I just wanted to plant a tree with my sister.
It's a box elder, a kind of maple that is considered a "trash tree" by many people,  but it gives good shade and just today I ate some mighty tasty seeds right off the tree today.



 
I guess I've been abducted by space aliens. So unprofessional. They tried to probe me with this tiny ad:
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https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/skip-0
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