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what's for dinner?  RSS feed

 
Eileen Daniels
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I've been using my thermal cooker quite a bit this winter. My favorite meals have a chicken stock base - soups, stews etc. I have the 7 Liter Saratoga Jack thermal cooker, so it makes a nice size pot for many bowls of soups and stews. I've been using it like an old caldron. I cook the soups, eat some and return it to the thermal cooker where it stays relatively warm. A quick warm up on the stove and it's nice and hot for the next meal. My body is craving this quick, healthy food and so I have it for two or more meals a day.  Once a week I roast a whole chicken in my Aroma Turbo Oven, giving me chicken leftovers. I make my stock from two chicken carcasses cooked in the thermal cooker.
 
Walt Chase
Posts: 93
Location: ALASKA
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Well, dinner tonight consisted of wild caught (by me) Alaskan Silver salmon (Coho) and home canned green beans from this past summers garden.
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
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Duck, turnip, red russian kale and peppers.

 
Maureen Atsali
pollinator
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Location: Western Kenya
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CJ- the local diet is even more bland than mine - especially during the drought, it is almost a mono-diet of maize.  Dried maize boiled with beans, maize flour made into porridge, maize flour made into ugali- something like corn meal mush or polenta (with no seasoning, just maize flour and water) roasted ears of maize...fried dried maize (corn-nuts!) deep fried maize doughballs.  Maize cooked every which way but Sunday.  If they are lucky, they cook up some green vegetable to dip their ugali (polenta-like mush) into.  Rich folks will eat their ugali with some beef stew.  I asked my husband what they were eating 100 years ago... and the answer was basically the same, except instead of maize, they used indigenous starches to make ugali - cassava, millet, sorghum, sweet potatoes. 
 
Maureen Atsali
pollinator
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Location: Western Kenya
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Wow Burra, that looks fantastic.  Can you share some of your favorite ways to cook duck?  We raise muscovies, but my cooking skills are kind of limited.  Usually we either deep fry or dry-roast it.  My husband insists something must be done to get the "oily flavor" out of the meat.
 
Tobias Ber
Posts: 494
Location: Northern Germany (Zone 8a)
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ok, not exactly dinner... we had frozen pizza together with the bread in the oven.


http://www.food.com/recipe/5-minute-artisan-bread-325571?photo=370894
(some nice person posted that link in another thread here)

i used 4 parts 550type flour and 1 part full grain wheat flour.

1 used 1 kg of flour and made this bread from approx. the half of the dough. the rest is in the fridge (as in the recipe) to be used for pizza and another, smaller bread.
taste is nice, a bit yeasty. but i probably took too much yeast and overproofed the dough a bit. higher temperature and a dutch ofen would have made a better crust, i think.



maureen,
did you check for chinese recipes for ducks? they make awesome stuff.
be blessed and good luck
brot.jpg
[Thumbnail for brot.jpg]
bread
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
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Location: Portugal
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bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
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Yesterday's lunch was the watermelon and grape salad that I already posted in the vegan thread.

watermelon-and-grape-salad-by-the-nora


And dinner was spicy pork chunks with watermelon rind.  I browned the meat over the gas stove in a cast iron pan, added the spices, stirred in the watermelon rinds (they were leftovers from the fruit salad - just take the green outer skin off and chop up the green/white fleshy bit), popped on the lid and stuck the whole thing in the solar cooker for a few hours.  Served with beetroot, apple and zucchini salad.

spicy-pork-and-watermelon-rind-cooked-in-solar-cooker


We seem to have a bit of a glut of watermelon at the moment so I'm making up another salad today, maybe with a dash of lemon juice and a dollop of greek yogurt this time, then I'll freeze the other half of the melon for use in smoothies or desserts later in the year, and either freezing or dehydrating the rinds.  I think I need a bigger solar dehydrator for all this stuff that's arriving from the garden...
 
Thyri Gullinvargr
gardener
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Location: Wisconsin, USA Zone 4b-5a
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Burra Maluca wrote:We seem to have a bit of a glut of watermelon at the moment so I'm making up another salad today, maybe with a dash of lemon juice and a dollop of greek yogurt this time, then I'll freeze the other half of the melon for use in smoothies or desserts later in the year, and either freezing or dehydrating the rinds.  I think I need a bigger solar dehydrator for all this stuff that's arriving from the garden...

Have you considered pickling the rinds?
 
John Newsom
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Very tasty buckwheat soup with mushrooms and dill )
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10012
Location: Portugal
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Mackerel with sweet potatoes and greens, mushrooms, garlic and coconut milk.

sweet-potatoes-with-greens


I'm becoming a huge fan of home-grown sweet potatoes. The tubers don't seem to grow overly big here, but the amount of greens you get from a whole plant seems to be a perfect balance for the amount of potato. Plus they are lovely soft gentle greens even at the end of a hot, dry summer when even the galega is looking a bit worse for wear.
 
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